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Full text of "Sou'wester Yearbook"


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CROSS the historic pages of eve^#ortl!v^ institution the protec 
shadow of some guiding personaHty is indelibly engraved in the 
policies, purposes, and traditions through which the institution ha| 
achieved recognition. 



The \vealth of tradition, of qu1et*coti'fa|fe arfd ri^ni fiving 
Southwestern tries to instill into its undergraduates has been en- 
riched through the earnest efforts of legion of consecrated 
fearing men, but back of all their efforts stands the dynamic figure 
of one dominating personality whose life and creed served as a 
plumbline by which they squared tfeiri^^licies'Mith the ideals they 
strove to emulate. 



In recognition of his inspiring infiuli&ej' we have gone into the 
romantichistory of that evangel of fire, "the Father of Methodism," 
John Wesley, for the theme of this, the 1932 Sou'wester, in the hope 
that a better understanding of Southwestern's traditional atmosphere 
of high idealism might be acquired. 








ExUDniS 



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19 3 2 

SOU^WESTER 



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SOU'WESTER 

. 19 3 2 




Published b^) 
Otiidents Association 

.■^■■■:- of ■- 

OolitnMrestern University 

Creorgetown, lexas 



DICATION 






EVEN as John Wesley, through a steadfast devotion to the high- 
est ideals of truth and beauty and love of mankind, blazed an 
imperishable trail of glory across the history of humanity's 
progress, so there is one whose unswerving loyalty to his finest con- 
ception of truth and justice has builded an enduring monument of 
respect and esteem in the hearts of the students. 

In himible recognition of his outstanding personality and scholarly, 
self-sacrificing application to his every task we respectfully dedicate 
this, the 1932 Sou'wester, to that able teacher, just critic, and 
devoted friend of the Southwestern student, George C. Hester. 




g„T?.-,-.<W54bil*T. '>'.i«^^^Mi 





REWORD 



I OUTH WESTERN'S glorious past, the opportunities for service 
that characterize its present, the vision of a progressive future, 
all must be molded into the men and women that pass through 
its experience-hallowed, ivy-grown walls if Southwestern is to con- 
tinue to build upon its solid foundation of service. The past, the 
present, the future, a chain to bind the sons of Southwestern in 
gossamer ties of unbreakable strength. Thus when the everyday, 
commonplace realities of the present become the mist-enshrouded 
romantic memories of the past, then may this book become a link 
to bind our middle-aged, conservative realism with the glorious 
visions of our youth. 




As to his skill as a horseman, any ungracefulness in his seat was doubtless accounted for by the fact that he always 
had a book in his hand. 



CONTENTS 

Wrder ol ijooks 



Book I 
ADMINISTRATION 

Book II 
COLLEGE LIFE 

Book III 
CLASSES 

Book IV 
ACTIVITIES 

Book V 
FAX'ORITES 

Book VI 
THE STADIUM 

Book VII 
THE SOU'JOKER 




During his stay in America Wesley never let a day pass without going among the Indians preaching and teaching 
the principles of Christ. 




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WE5LEY BOOTHE 

Jbnitor-in-L.liieI 

W. G. ELZNER 

Jjusmess JVLanager 

SOUTHWESTERN 
ENGRAVING CO. 



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TLe E. L. STECK Co. 

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While at Christ Church, John Wesley and a small group 
of intimate friends, who were called Methodists by their 
associates, discussed ([uestions of duty, laid down a defi- 
nite scheme of self-examination, and assigned to every 
evening some special duty of \'irtue for discussion. 



ADMINISTRATION 




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ADMINISTRATION 



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Editor's Paee 



April 20th will long be remembered by "Red," the editor. This day was the greatest 
day in his life, because it meant the time which has long been looked for — the day when the 
much talked-about annual had been completed. 

Pardon me if I have talked about the book too much or have taken up too much of your time 
trying to find out what kind of a book you wanted. If I have been rude and sarcastic, etc., 
v^^hile I have been around you, I am indeed sorry and ask you to forgive me, for it has been un- 
consciously and unintentionally done. 

I have enjoyed the work immensely, and it has indeed been a pleasure and an honor. I 
sincerely trust that I have lived up to the honor given me. I have done my best, and if you 
find any mistakes please try to overlook them — I am by no means perfect. Thanks to the 
staff! Never have I worked with a group which has been so faithful and loyal. They have 
indeed proven to be friends. 

Both the staff, editor and business manager have worked many nights, losing sleep, energy, 
sacrificing pleasures, busting courses, missing classes, losing weight, burning up brain energy 
(as far as it goes), in order that a book might be distributed which would be a credit and 
honor to the great school which it represents. If this has been accomplished then we have 
more than been repaid for the time, energy and effort placed in the book. 

A combined effort of the editor and business manager, perfect co-operation and advice given 
to both by the faculty, students and friends. We only hope and pray that we have fulfilled 
your desires and wishes. 

Because of the book with its theme we hope that you will pattern your lives to some extent 
after John Wesley, living the best lives possible, laboring hard in order to overcome difficulties 
and in the end saying with Wesley, "The world is my Parish." 

Wesley (Red) Boothe, Editor. 



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Page iS 



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King Vivion 
B. A.,M. A.,B. D.,D. D., LL.D, 

Vrcs\i\cnl 



Page ;p 




R. W. Ttnsley, B. S. 

Ai'Sistont to the Prcsiknt 



O. A. Ullrich, 
. A.,M, A., Ph. D. 
Dam of tlic Faculty 



Page so 







Laura Kuykendall, 
B.A.M.A. 

Dean oj WoHiLii 



HE. Meyer 

Dam oj Music 



Page 21 



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I. J. McCooK 

Bii-S'iiu\s.s Maimen' 



Pearl A. Neas 
Kcoxstrar 




Margaret Mood McKennon, B. A. 



E. H. Hereford 
B. A.,B. S., M. A., Ph. D. 

Malinger o/MooJ Hall 




Page 22 




Claud Howard, B, A. , M. A. , Ph. D. 
Professor of English 



H. L. Gray, B. A. 
Processor of Bible aud Religion 



G. C. Hester, B. A,,M. A. 
Associate Professor of History and Political 
Science 



w, c. Vaden, b. a., m. a. 

Professor of Latin, Greek and French 



Ruth Morgan Ferguson, B. A., M. A. 
Assistant Professor of English 



J. C. GoDBEY, B. A., M. A. 
Professor of Chemistry 



P. P. Young, B. A., M. A. 
Associate Professor of History 



M. L. Williams, B. A., M. A. 
Professor of Economics and Sociology 



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F. C. A. Lehmberg, B. a., M. a. 
Professor of German and French 



Katherine Field Tarver, B. A. , M. A. 
Assistant Professor of English 



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Page 23 




A. R. Wapple, B. S., M, a. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



R. W. TiNSLE,-, B. S. 
Professor of Biology and Geology 



Lucy Bei le Morgan, B. A., M. A. 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 



W. P. Davidson, B. A. 
Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 



C. M. Edens, B. a. 
Director of Athletics and Coach 



R. V. Guthrie, Jr., B. A., M. A., M. S. 
Associate Professor of Pnysics 



Annie Edward Barcus, B. A., M. A. 
Assistant Professor of English 



L.J. Waggoner, B. A., B. D., M. A. 

Associate Professor of Religious Education 

and History 



Van Collier Tipton , B. A. , M D. 
^■' University Physician 



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R.J. KiDD, B. A. 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 



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Page i-f 



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O. A. Ullrich, B. A., M. A., Ph. D. 
Dean of the Faculty; Professor of Education 



E. R. Hardin, B. A., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Public Speaking and 

Draiiitic Literature 



Anita Storrs Gaedcke 
Instructor in Violin 



E. H. Hereford, B. A., B. S. in Ed. 

M. A.,Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Education 



H. E. Meyer 

Dean of Music, Professor of Voice, Piano, 

Organ and Theory 



Josephine DiLTs, B. M. E 
Instructor in Voice, Piano and Theory 



W. P. Wisdom, B. A., M. A. 
Instructor in Chemistry 



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Elizabeth Cotton, B. A. 
Instructor in Physical Training, Spanish 
and Education 



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Laura Kuykendall, B. A., M. A. 
Director of Expression 



Page 2$ 



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Georgia B^ Bridgers 

Ho.stc.ss to tlic WoiMaii'i BiiilJiiig 
Rita C. McClain 

Dietitian 
Agnes Ericson, R. N, 

Pauline Jordan 

Secretary to Dciiii 0/ Women 
Edn4Und Heinson 

Pii5tor Fir5t MctlioJist Clinnli 

Florence Campbell 

SarcUry to tlic President 



Sue Simpson 

Scirctcir)' to R. W. TuLslc)' 
Thad Son 

AiSLstiint 111 Bii.siiicsi 0|ficc 
Tom Clark 

Assistant to BiisiMc.s.'i jMciiuigcr 
Lois Clark 

Asii.stiiiit to RcgLstriir 
Albert May 

Campus Manager 




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John Wesley was a spiritual leader, forming throughout 
the length and breadth of the land societies for whose 
administration and teaching he must provide. 



C O L L E G EL I F E 



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UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

"Miss represented can't be far away. 
After the University storms, the rainbow 
usually shines. Miss Bal Bearing, (a la 
Virginia Stewart) looks better sitting than 
she does walking. Just Mr. Davidson and 
Miss Neas, (Mrs. Davidson in the back- 
ground). Joe, one of our young Pirates. 
Cortes, Gill, and others are just meekly 
cutting a class. All picnics start at the 
Dean's tower." 



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"\\'ell. I took clipmistry the first term. 
I took this picture of the bottles so I could 
know good chemicals. Lib and Cutie 
Ransom was always coming in late and 
Davis had't tell 'em to "get". Chemistry 
ain't so hot. The heat in the Science 
Building is awful less. Doc. Godby counts 
on the Tinsley brand of hot air to help. 
Slim Whittle shows the latest style in 
goggles to hide bloodshot eyes." 



' 




*;»*^-. 



■ ' 



MOOD HALL 

Well, Etta, here's Mood Hall where no 
girls are ever ever allowed to enter. Even 
at college, they are still country, so A. C. 
shows some of his talents. Just a fine 
adieu, Hicks is sitting in the car!! You may 
think that this is Juliet's balcony but on 
the contrary, it is only Mood Hall. Cortes 
has just returned from his Honor Council 
meeting with the dean. Where well man 
dress spring from, the Toggery. 





MOOD HALL 

"Pa, tliis Plioto shows Pt-terman in his 
favorite position for studying. I snapped 
this reclining pose to show how Mr. Sealy 
would not make us sleep. We jump rope 
when classes get dull. They call Fred 
Sterling "Homer" since Buss left. I don't 
understand. P. G. Secrest is here reading 
the Phi Manual "Aphrodite" to a fresh- 
man. " 




"Baskin tuld Ddwiu tlic Tri Delt Con- 
vention was in Canada; (Picture sliows 
scene of convention). Pivito takes to 
horses or liorses to Pivito; they have some- 
thing in common. King had a house- 
party; oh! what a party. Terry used 
Zilch's favorite; soap and water was free. 
Bill and Red turned cowhands. Slim 
Whittle thinks he's driving a Chewy — 
well, is he? Look at the Pecos Bridge 
Mamma Zilch. " 




ON THE CAMPUS 

"Oh Etta! Somebody went to sleep in 
Dr. Hereford's class and when they woke 
up it was moonlight. A beautiful building 
on the outside. Pivito is after Peterman 
again. Here you have steweds in their 
favorite pose coming out of class. Hicks 
sees Oatman and a Zeta — hence, the stride. 
Miss Neas even comes out to see any loose 
males. These Indians are selling blankets 
and Fuller Brushes. — where is Mac?" 



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CAMPUS CUTIES 

"Brooks, peacefully babbling in the 
noon day sun. Fred Lee, Tommy Thom- 
as, Billy Cox and others are taking their 
hourly stroll to the Kappa Sigma House. 
Louise Dickens, just a school girl on her 
bike. Treading their way to the Woman's 
Building is no other than the Tri Delt 
Dizzy blondes. Gill Phares is in one of 
his dancing moods. Toot, toot, nobody 
but Bob Simpson. Tweet, tweet, look at 
the Birdies Gill and Dinks." 



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THE PIRATE TAVERN 

"Oil, Pa, here is the place where the co- 
eds get their male every day. It is better 
than tlie Woman's Building for getting a 
late date. Here is where we "Drink a 
bite to eat" because we are too brolie to 
eat anything. Won't say anything about 
Cortes and Harding!! It speaks for itself. 
Huitt is pondering the parked Tri Delt 
cars pondering which one to park in." 



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MORE DORM 

" Ma. this is our P. T. Instructor, Sparger 
is waiting on her call. .Another view of 
the Inferno. Grizzlie, SUCH .A LOVE!!!!! 
Mrs. McClaine, our Hfe, and our best 
dietitian. How he gets over in college i.s 
no other than Carter Fuller and all the 
Woman's Building girls are feasting their 
eyes on him. But it doesn't do them any 
good, eh! Romeo. " 








The Ole Swimmin' Hole, — Wimmin 

"Well, folks, this would be a beautiful 
picture if Bill Murray wasn't in it. Tlie 
boys bother here on Saturdays and see all 
the Ivory soap? Prof. Hester and wife is 
seen nestling in the Blue Bonnets. Even 
profs can go wrong in the spring. These 
are the K. A.'s during the day. It is 
beautiful by moonlight, — but nobody seems 
to remember about any moonlight. Es- 
pecially the Phi Mus. " 



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"Look Ma, here is the Woman's Building. 
This is the melting pot of scandal and low- 
down. Here is powder-covered dirt — go in 
this sesame of women, a good woman and 
try to come out the same. No one ever 
saw the floosies in so lady-like a moment. 
These are pos^s, — to deceive the raving 
eye a la Kuykendall. The Alpha Delts 
stick together on Saturday night and play 
bridge?!!" 




"A bunch of Alpha Delts in a Bull Ses- 
sion. Etta, it would be worth listening to. 
Virginia pretties up. Where's the piano, 
Edna? Eddie Mae is waiting for Rumble. 
Pauline Jordon is merely meditating. The 
Ward, Helen Korges, Marie and Ester. 
Etta, this is the swellest place to live in 
when you can find plenty to do. A bird's- 
eye view from third at Beatty and Kathryn 
Browing." 



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"Where are Ruth Frenche's eyes? Bill 
Wisdom had a happy thought! Sneed in 
the moonlight or in the hmclight one. 
Hardin and Ransome, the honor council 
members, are chatting. Just peeping in at 
Windy's Window. Wacker and Wigham 
waiting to see the dean. Little R'p, the 
man with the great deep bass voice. Who's 
the man, Lib? Sara Moore takes a fling. 
Even Bergin can dance. Who is it, iVIurph? 
Patterson in one of his daily poses." 



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BEHOLD, THE INSTITUTE 

"Well, pa, the boys are taking their after 
dinner smoke, wonder where all the girls 
are? Two grinning Deltas, hincle and 
dincle. Catch me, I'm a Butterfly, La 
Venia. Such poise Hilma. Oh, doodness 
dracious, it couldn't be no one but Morgan. 
Just a street lamp!! The camera caught 
Miss Tarver, ma, she's our English 
teacher." 



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GOLF 

"Pa. Hole-in-onc. Dr. Howard, if you don't 
believe it ask him wlio made a new golf 
course on the campus. It endangers all 
the pretty co-eds walking to and from 
classes and they had to buy helmets for 
protection. What form! Bill Connely is 
just putting. They call her Adelise, but 
they should call her Grace. Even the Kap- 
pa Sigs play, golf, it must be a good game. 
Miss Cotton in 'How I play golf." 



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TOUCH FOOTBALL 

"Well, Etta, you can't come out on the 
field in these afternoons. Lefty, before 
hitting the job. Frank and Claudy seeing 
that it is well done. All these freshmen 
and others are Southwestern good subs and 
on-lookers. Where are you going, Kellogg? 
Mr. Wapple, attempting to run from the 
camera. Walter Wood is telling his se- 
crest. Puggy, in figure thirteen. .And 
then they do play ball." 




m 




.jstr.'*-«i«' . "** 




HORSES 

"Etta, this is wliere you'd sliine. Tlie 
girls take out to the brush and other bridle 
paths and sure enough have a wild ride for 
their money. Lib is the chief obstacle for 
all horses. All the Tri Delts take out for 
reducing purposes. Dee Dee. such a pair! 
The real view of the Zetas on their Monday 
morning Hoppity hoppity hops. Just a 
little polo between rides. What would 
they do without the San Gaberiel." 



I'i: ,*'■ 







SPARE MV BLUSHES 

" Here is the golf course of Hole-in-one- 
Howard's fame. The scenery is full of 
snakes, hair pins, old rags and remains of 
blankets. This is the Phi Delt pinning 
grounds, — mostly Tri Delts can stand the 
strain of daily trips. Why does Lib pose 
with ducks? Lib should pass the plate in- 
stead of her glass. Notice closely Budda's 
Crossing! Oh! Etta!!." 




GOOD OLD SCENES 

"Ma. you should sec the Lion's Head 
by daylight, believe-it-or-not. B0I3 and 
Lou'se arc having a dizzy ride. Clark is 
having a good — looking around trying to 
keep up with the — er bumble bees. Dr. 
Gray has always been a good sport on 
the picnics. The Alpha Delts are great 
swimmers, led by Heath. What a deal, 
Murray! Rest is familiar scenes at Cad- 
do, eh Lib?" 




"Well. Etta, tills is a placo where you're 
supposed to go in the Spring time. All the 
famous pinings have been done around 
here, so Lion's Head has its purpose. This 
is Bob and Abbie; and in front of him is 
Lover's Bluff; we ain't certain what kind 
yet. Thomasine and Irene are peering 
over the bluff, eh???" 



i! 




MASK AND \VU; PLAYS - 

"Well, folks, we have had some real good 
plays this year. You should have seen all 
of 'em. Look. Ma. This is a scene of 
"Ten Night" in the Bar Room," and look. 
here is Tete and Blossom in their skits. 
.And then here's poor little Mary stretched 
out on the cold, cold floor. Fred is just 
another bar-tender. " 





MORE COLLEGE PLAYS 

"And then look at this play. Pa, it's 
"Suicide "Tlien liere's Carter Fuller when 
he played in Miss Tarver's play "Plum 
Distracted." And then look at the Fear- 
less Quartet, they faded out before the 
final measures were played. Then look at 
Merlon of the Movies; it was really a good 
one. The other scenes are just bar-room 
scenes of more Ten Nights in a Bar-room. 
Look at Eleanor and all the dummies. 



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FORBIDDEN 

■'Oh, Etta, the bottle is forbidden. — 
but hold on it's Factor and Brooks. Sweet 
forbidden things, look at Cotton, Eanier, 
Thomasine and Newberry in all the blue- 
bonnet patch after climbing over the barb- 
wire fence. A. C. just gave Gladys his 
band pin on this rock. Ojihajika, well, 
that's forbidden too." 



I (I, « 




Monday April 1, 17 59 \\esle\ preached for the first time 
in the open air. After that he preached again and again 
until his audiences during the month aggregated forty 
thousand persons. Wesley became the evangelist and re- 
former, his parish the world. 



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PAULINE JORDAN, M. A. 

in English 

CoofCY 



WILLIAM PIERCE WISDOM, M. S. 

m Chemistry 

Hflmiltoii 



LILLIAN BLANCHE THOMPSON, M. A. 

in History 

AmanWo 



CLOVIS HUDDLESTON, M. S. 

in Chemistry 

EHflsmllf 



SHERMAN LESESNE, M. S. 

in Chemistry 

Cciitcri'illc 



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Page 56 




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Richardson 



Murray 



Senior Class Officers 



FALL TERM 

Will Mann Richardson Prcsuicnt 

Clyde Whittle ...... ViccPrcsiJciit 

Maxine Ray SarctaryTrcasurcr 

WINTER TERM 

Glynn Terry Prcsiicnt 

BuRGiN Dunn ....... Vu'c-PrcsiJcMt 

Blossom Nall Secretary-Treasurer 

SPRING TERM 

William P. Murray President 

Charles Fredrick Vxee-President 

Sybil Swinnea SccreUiry'Treasurer 



Page 5ii 



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JEWELL ALEXANDER 
Houston 

Miijor: Economic ani Sociology 



LENA BELLE BASKIN 
Cameron 

Major: History and GoKTnmcitt 

Delta Delta Delta, Executive 
Committee, University Honor 
Council. 



GEORGE W. BENNETT 

MliilotlllilH 

Miijor: BiWc mi Religion 

Ministerial Association, Lite 
Service Band, Y. M. C. A., Ep- 
worth League Cabinet. 



BEN BOHMFALK 
San Antonio 

Major: BiMi' and Religion 

Life Service Band, President 
Ministerial Association, Univer- 
sity Chorus, Intercollegiate De- 
baters, Band, Scholarslup Society, 
Sigma Tau Delta. 





ELI ARONSON 
Elgin 

Major: Chemistry 

Mood Hall Honor Council, Y. 
M. C. A., Science Society, Maga- 
rine Start. 



MARY BELLE BATTE 
Ciiimroii 

M.ij or: CliL-misiry 

Delta Delta Delta. 



THOMAS W. BISHOP 

Hairiii' 

Major: Fii!;Iisli 

San Jacinto Literary Society, 
Gl;e Club '27, Band '24, Annual 
Staff '22 and '27, Magazine 
Staff '27. 



MARGARET CALDWELL 

Odem 

Major: Hi.sto>-y iiiicJ Goi'iTiinuiit 

Epworth League Cabinet, Life 
Service Band, Music Club, San 
Jacinto Literary Society. 



Page 59 



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FLORENCE CAMPBELL 

Tyler 

Major: Bihlc and Rcliqum 

Secretary to President, Schol- 
arship Society. 



BURTON COLEMAN 

HillsLor-i' 

Mnjor; B;Mc and Religion 

Life Service Band, Ministerial 
Association. 

Transfer from fiillsboro Junior 
College. 



RUBY COOPER 

Georgetown 

Major: Dramalic LitirotHrc 

Assistant Librarian, Mask and 
Wig, Pi Epsilon Delta. 



LOUISE DICKEN 
Duncan, Okla. 

Major: Mu.sic 

Student Assistant in Violin, 
Orchestra, Scholarship Society, 
Y, W. C. A., Woman's Building 
Honor Council. 




EDDIE MAE CLARK 
Pliomi.r, Arir. 

Major: Eiigli.'^li 

Y. W. C. A., Life Service 
Band, Scholarship Society, Ep- 
worth League Cabinet, Mega- 
phone StafF, Woman's Building 
Honor Council, Mask and Wig. 



WILLIAM CONERLY 
Floru'H, Ld. 

Miijor: BiWe aiiiJ Religion 

President Life Service Band, 
Ministerial Association, Univers- 
ity Chorus. 

Transfer from Lon Morris. 



H. W. CORTES 

Hoifitoii 

Miijor- History am] Goi'cTiimcMt 

Kappa Alpha, University Hon- 
or Council, Mask and Wig. 



FRANK DRISKILL 
Croclictt 

Major: Clicmislry 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Megaphone 
StafF, German Club, Men's Pan- 
Hellenic, President Junior Class 
Fall Term, 



Page 60 



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BURGIN DUNN 
Lock III! rt 

Major. Chemistry 

Kappa Alpha, Vice-President 
Student Association, University 
Honor Council, Mood Hall Honor 
Council, Pirate Band, Orchestra, 
Vikings, German Club, Vice- 
President Freshman Class, Presi- 
dent Sophomore Class, Science 
Society. 



TOM ERICSON 

Georgetown 

Major: Chemistry 



VICTOR FOERSTER 

Manor 

Miijor: History iiiul Government 

"S" Association, Football '29- 
'32, Track '29, University Cho- 
rus, Mood Hall Honor Council, 
German Club. 



HENRY FOX 
Gnmger 

Miijor; En^li.sli 

Y. M. C. A., Megaphone 



Staff. 





ELIZABETH EDWARDS 
Georgetown 

Major: Eiijilisli 

Phi Mil. Co-Ed Band, Univers- 
ity Chorus, Sigma Tau Delta, 
Writer's Club, Epw^orth League 
Cabinet, Life Service Band. 



AGNES ERICSON 

Gcorgctou'ii 

University Nurse 



GRACE FOSTER 
Giorgttouii 

Miijor: DnimutiL Literature 



CHARLES FREDRICK 
D.ill.ii 

Miijor: EiDMomus ani Sociology 

Kappa Alpha, Executive Com 
mittee, German Club. 



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CARTER FULLER 
Lufkni 
Miijor: Dnimiitk" Litiniliiiv 
President Freshman Class, San 
Jacinto Literary Society, Glee 
Club, University Chorus, Presi- 
dent Methodist Student Federa- 
tion of Texas, University Honor 
Council, Y. M. C. A., National 
Collegiate Players, Mask and 
Wig, Student Athletic Council, 
President Scholarship Society, 
Editor Magazine, Executive Com- 
mittee , Debators, Pi Kappa Delta, 
Sigma Tau Delta. 



ELIZABETH COULD 

Taylor 

MiijDr Pluli).S()['liy iiiiJ I'svdioliigy 

Kappa Alpha Theta, University 
Honor Council, Pep Squad, Rid- 
er's Club, Secretary Sophomore 
Class. 



LOUISE HARDIN 

Gfllf-Sl'lllL- 

Miijor: Dramiilii Litir.ituri 

Zeta Tau Alpha, University 
Honor Council, Mask and Wig, 
Rider's Club. 



NELL HARRIS 

GcorgcUnm 

Miijur. Draimilk Liliriituri 

Pi Epsilon Delta, Pep Squad, 
Phi Mu, Mask and Wig, Woman's 
Pan-Hellenic. 




LILLIAN GORZYCKI 

Collii;.: StiitiOH 

Miijur: Clicmi.stry 

Life Service Band, Woman's 
Building Hor;c. Council, Scholar- 
ship Society, Science Society, 
Student Volunteer, President San 
Jacinto Literary Society, Univer- 
sity Chorus, Epworth League 
Cabinet, Texas Academy of 
.Science, 



RALPH HAMME 
EJmlmrj; 

Miliar: Clumistry 

Pi Kappa Alpha, President 
Men's Pan-Hellenic, Football '30 
and '3L 



JAMES HARRIS 
Gcorgcioivn 

Miijor: Eioiiomui iiiul So.iolotiy 

Kappa Alpha, Yell Leader, 
'S" Association. 



A C. HART 

MtTclJi.S 

Miijor ELonomiuS .JiiJ Soiioloi;)' 

Pirate Band, Manager Orches- 
tra, Vikings, Mask and Wig. 



(iviil' 



Page 6-' 



WILLIE LEE HEATH 

Madisonvillc 

Major: Dramatic Literature 

Alpha Delta Pi, Woman's 
Building Honor Council, Mask 
and Wig, Woman's Pan-Hellenic. 



CARL HUDDLESTON 

EUannlk 

Major; Clumiitry 

"S" Association, Tennis '30, 
'31. '32. 



LUCINDA MAE ISSACS 
Giorgiiou'ii 

M.ijor: Draitwtii Littraturi: 
Phi Mu. 



MARJORIE KARBACH 

Temple 

Major: BiWe aiiJ Religion 

Y. W. C. A., Life Service 
Band, Woman's Building Honor 
Council, University Chorus. 




LUCILLE HODGES 

Georoetoii'ii 

Major: SpaiiLsli 

Alpha Delta Pi, Spanish Club, 
Scholarship Society. 



MITTIE HUTTON 
Georgetou'n 

Miij'or: Bilile aiij Religion 

Scholarship Society. 



EUNICE JAMES 
Aiiitiii 

Major: Pliilowpliy aiiJ P.syeliology 

Y.W.C. A. President, Scholar- 
ship Society, Epworth League 
Cabinet, Life Service Band, Wo- 
man's Building Honor Council, 
Stucient Volunteers, Sigma Tau 
Delta. 



SPRUCE KEEN 

Memirj 

Major: Hi.Nloryan.J Goivriiment 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Football '30 
and '31. 



.( !■ 



Page 6J 



m 






MARIE KILGORE 
Beaumont 

Major: Music 

Scholarship Society, University 
Chorus, Music Club, San Jacinto 
Literary Society. 



LILBURN MAY 

Georgetown 

Major: Mathematics 

Football '29, '30, '31. Track 
'29, '30, '31, "S" Association. 



MABEL DAUGHERTY NALL 
Pittilmrijli, Pcnnii. 

Major: Latin 

Delta Delta Delta, Megaphone 
Staff, Woman's Building Honor 
Council, Editor Senior Edition of 
the Megaphone, San Jacinto 
Literary Society, Scholarship So- 
ciety. 



MADGE QUEBEDEAUX 
Georgetown 

Major: Economics and Sociology 

Alpha Delta Pi. German Club, 
Woman's Pan-Hellenic, San Ja- 
cinto Literary Society. 





DICK LOWRY 

Temple 

Major: Bilile and Religion 

Ministerial Association, Uni- 
versity Chorus, Epworth League 
Cabinet, Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



WILLIAM P. MURRAY 
Lii Fcna 

Major: Economies and Sociology 

Pi Kappa Alpha, President 
Men's Pan-Hellenic, Band, Or- 
chestra, Vikmgs, President Y. M. 
C. A., Executive Committee, 
Mood Hall Honor Council, Editor 
Megaphone, Vice-President Junior 
Class, President Senior Class, 
Annual Staff. 



HELEN PURL 
Gcorgetoim 

Major: Eeonomie.s and Soeiology 

German Club. 



EVELYN RAETZSCH 

M(ir/(i 
Major: Dramatu" Literature 
Delta Delta Delta, Megaphone 
Staff, Annual Staff, San Jacinto 
Literary Society, German Club, 
Orchestra, Music Club, Y. W. 
C. A. , Epworth League Cabinet, 
University Honor Council, Wo- 
man's Pan-Hellenic, Mask and 
Wig, Executive Committee, Sec- 
retary Student Association, Pi 
Epsilon Delta. 



Page 64 



MAXINE RAY 
Jacksonville 

Major: SpaHuli 

Delta Delta Delta, Pep Squad, 
Spanish Club, Annual Staff, Uni- 
versity Chorus, Secretary Junior 
Class, Secretary Senior Class, 
Scholarship Society. 



JONNIE ROSS 
Lomcta 

Major: Philosophy ami Psychology 

Phi Mu, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
Woman's Building Honor Coun- 
cil, Woman's Pan-Hellenic. 



ESTHER SAATHOFF 
Honi^o 

Major. Music (Voice) 

University Chorus, Music 
Club, San Jacinto Literary So- 
ciety, German Club. 



P. G. SECREST, JR. 
Bay City 

Major: Clu'ini^try 

Phi Delta Theta, Scholarship 
Society, President Student As- 
sociation, German Club, Tutor in 
Chemical Department, Mood Hall 
Honor Council, Executive Com- 
mittee, President Sophomore 
Class, Men's Pan-Hellenic, Sci- 
ence Society. 




WILL MANN RICHARDSON 
Georgetown 

Major: Dramatic Literature 

Phi Delta Theta, Scholarship 
Society, Mask and Wig, Vice- 
President Freshman Class, Presi- 
dent Senior Class, Science Socie- 
ty, Pirate Band, Pi Epsilon Delta. 



CHARLES RUMBLE 

Edinhurg 

Major: CliciHistry 

Epworth League Cabinet, Life 
Service Band, President Minister- 
ial Association, University Cho- 
rus, Science Society, Scholarship 
Society, American Chemistry So- 
ciety, President Young People's 
Department. 



VANCE SEAMANS 
Wcslaeo 

Major: Hi.story ami Government 

Assistant Coach Football "28, 
'29, '30,Basketbair28, '29, '30, 
'31. Captain '30, Baseball '27, 
Pi Kappa Alpha, "S" Association 
President '32. 



ROBERT SIMPSON 
Corpu.s Clinsti 

Major: Pliysics 

Vikmgs Band, Director '32, 
Orchestra, Spanish Club, Science 
Society. 



Page 65 



THAD SON 

Brownuvoi 

Miijiir: BiMi iimi Riliijum 

Intercollegiate Debators, Uni- 
versity Chorus, Ministerial As- 
sociation. 



MORRIS STUDER 

]nhmd 

Major; History (iii;l GoivrMiiu'iit 

Epworth League Cabinet, 
Mood Hall Honor Council, Presi- 
dent '32, University Chorus. 



,S1BYL SWINNEA 

Ri'iH;:iii 

Miijor; C'liiiiiislry 

Woman's Building Honor 
Council, Spanish Club, San Ja- 
cinto Society 



RUTH TIPTON 

]ac]iHinviUc 

Major: Music ''Piano) 

Delta Delta Delta. Executive 

Committee, Scholarship Society, 

University Chorus, Secretary lun- 

lor Class, Music Club. Y. W! C. 

A. 

CLYDE WHITTLE 

Lll ll'H 

Mdjor. Pliysiis 
Mood Hall Honor Council, 
University Honor Council, Vice 
President Student Association, 
Vice-President Y. M. C. A.. Ep- 
worth League Cabinet, Baseball 
'28, Basketball '28-'31, Captain 
'30, High Point Man in Texas 
Conference Basketball '30, Texas 
Conference Center '29-' 31 , Most 
Valuable Man '30, Football '31, 
Vice-President Senior Class, "S" 
Association. 




MARY EMMERSON 
SPARGER 

G('(ir|;i-t(iii'n 

Miijcir: Dniiiiiitk- Liliraturc 

Zeta Tau Alpha, Mask and 
Wig, Pep Squad, Woman's Build- 
ing Honor Council. 



WILLIAM R. STUMP 

Gior^t'lou'ii 

Miijor: Oumi.strv 

Phi Delta Theta. Business 
Manager Magazine, Scholarship 
Society, Science Society, Mask 
and Wig University Honor Coun- 
cil. 

GLYNN TERRY 
RuliluHil Spri/ins 

Major: Chemistry 

Kappa Alpha, Mood Hall Hon- 
or Council, Vice-President Y. M. 
C. A , Executive Committee, 
Football '29-'3L, "S" Associa- 
tion, German Club, Business 
Manager Megaphone. 



HALLIE WILCOX 

Georgetown 

M.iior: Hislnry iiii.l GoivniHiifNt 
Co-Ed Band. 



REBA YOUNG 
Cameron 

Major: History and Government 

Zeta Tau Alpha, Pep Squad, 
Y. W. C. A., San Jacinto Liter- 
ary. 



1 £■ 



Page 66 




JUNIORS 



rrx 




Gray 



Patterson 



Weir 



Jimior Class Officers 



FALL TERM 






Milton Gray 
William M. Smith 
Thomasine Howell 



WooDROW Patterson 

WlLBURN OaTMAN 

Nelda Praether 



Howard Weir 
Warren Davis 
Mary Lucille Miller 



WINTER TERM 



SPRING TERM 



President 

Viee-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



.f; 



n 



Page 



Chester Allen 
Georgetown 



Mildred Barron 
Jcu'ctt 



Marshall Bolton 
Rusk 



Ellsworth Brooks 

Bcllrillc 



Ransom Buchholz 

Georgetown 



,/' T 



iH, 




]. Link Baker 

Kemp 



MiFRF Bledsoe 
Port Arthur 



Wesley Boothe 
Daisetta 



Warren Brown 
HoiLstoii 



Mary Jane Burnet 
Milaiio 



^ \ 



fage 69 



/!\\ 



■!"■■". 



Florence Chambers 
Bccnniu'iit 



Kenneth Crawford 

Jarrcll 



Barton Davis 
Georgetown 



Edwin Day 
Cameron 



Emmett Dubberly 
Prosper 




John W. Crawford 

McAlln. 



Philmore Czarowit: 

Bartlctt 



Warren Davis 

Don 111! 



Seth Dorbandt 
Georgetown 



Lennie Dubberly 
Prosper 



'^^ 



Page ;o 



'I ;' 



/r-i 



Leldon DuPuy 
Mcxia 



Gladys Ferguson 

LiT_si'i!lc, Lci. 



Margaret Ferguson 
LccsnUc, La. 



Lois Giron 
San Anti'MK) 



LORNE HamME 

Edinhurg 




Whitlow Elzner 
Bastrop 



Ford Ferguson 

Lccsi'illt', La. 



Frances Geeslin 
Ed 1 III' II rg 



Milton Gray 
hlaccigdcchcs 



Peninsula Hahn 
Gcorgctoim 






Page 71 



riA 



czz 



-"hi;': 



LoRETTA Henley 
Ba-ki'illc 



Martin Johnson 
Hntto 



Elizabeth King 
Atlanta 



James Lancaster 
Las Vegas, J\[. M. 



Claud Lunsford 
Georgetown 





ToMASiNE Howell 
Orange 



Miller Jordan 
Wcslaco 



Roy Kurth 
Lufkin 



Floyd Luker 

San Augustine 



Peggy Lusk 

Wcslaco 



Page ;.' 



■Tf^- 



Joe McAuliffe 
Corpis ChnsU 



MoRAN McDaNIELS 

Georgetown 



Irene Mings 
Gilmer 



WiLBURN OaTMAN, Jr. 

Llano 



James Patterson 
Henderson 






^ 



/(4 




)lM MtCl URE 
Doillli! 



Marv Lucille Miller 
Uvalde 



Emma Alice Nicholson 
Hou.ston 



BtATTY Oldham 
Palestine 



Cecil Pennington 

An5tlll 



Page 7J 



I(..k 



Wallace Pittman 
Carlton 



Nelda Prather 
Beaumont 



William Smith 
Hondo 



Fred Sterling 
Gali'c.stoii 



Bluford Stinchcomb 
Loiigincw 




Ferrel Pledger 

Tyler 



George Smith 
Be lion 



Margaret Sneed 
Calvert 



Loraine Still 
Houston 



Joe Tipton 
Bflrtlclt 



Page 74 



flA 



Arthur Wacker 
Biirtlftt 



Howard Weir 
Georgetown 



Duncan Whiteside 
Austin 



Dave Williams 
Mtjrlu) 



Ellis Wood 
Ai'onJijlc, Pa. 




C. J. Watson 
Florence 



Mainor Westbrook 
Fijrrsnllt 



Eugene Wiemfrs 
Georgetown 



Walter Wood 
Corpus ClirLsli 



Sam Laird 

Slid Saha 



I '' 



Fage 75 






Page 76 




sophomore; 



Page 77 






■t V 



',1 ■ fi 




DORBANDT 



Wallace 



Monroe 



ODhomore Class Officers 









Seth Dorbandt 
Maurice Monroe 
Helen Korges 

Paul Wallace 

ClAYTE BlNION . 

Josephine Shannon 



FALL TERM 



WINTER TERM 



SPRING TERM 



Maurice Monroe . 
Clayte Binion . 
CHpr.HiLLE DeBardeleben 



PrcsiJent 

Vicc'Prcsxicnt 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Presiilent 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Page 7S 



/■/., 



Harry Allen 

Taylor 



Clayte Binion 



Marlin Brockette 
Copperas Cove 



Mack Buckaloo 
Tlirif Rii'trs 



Victor Collins 
Bay City 



Paul Dornbluth 
Ciiero 



K 




Anna Louise Bauman 



Robert Brent 
DaWas 



Dorothy Bryan 

DcuUur 



Beatrice Casbeer 
Liiinfiiisiis 



Will Ford Crunk 
Gcors^etowH 



Cherrille DeBardeieben 
Brou'iisrillt' 



^'.y 



Huge /Cj 



^'.^ 



Gill DeWitt 
Houston 



Mabel Ericson 
Georgetown 



Mary Janice Eaktor 
El Gi mpo 



Edith Foster 

Citorgt'tou'K 



Veia Mae Erenzel 
Thornialc 



MlIDRED GiLIUM 

Georgetown 



\ .^- 




BiLL Dunn 

Loclihart 



Monroe Fairchild 
Burke 



R. L. Elowers, Jr. 
Georgetown 



Ruth French 
Denton 



C. H. Gee 

Georgetown 



Curtis Gunn 
Houston 



Page So 



Addilese Haag 

MUland 



Fannie A. Hardt 
Paint Roc]< 



Kirk Hood 

Palacios 



Lois Johns 

Gcorgetou'H 





1: 


,<^^ 


1 


Ervin Jordan 




^* 


Art 




mn 





Charles Kellog 

Ml- A! I en 




Jack Hamilton 

Mint-nil Wells 



Frances Hicks 
Henderson 



Ralph Huitt 
Bciinmont 



Gladys Johnson 
Liilin^ 



Ruby Lea Jones 
Matins 



Felix Kindel 
Pernn 



Fage Xi 






Helen Korges 
Elgin 



Ella V. Lanier 
Jiisptr 



Charles Laurence 
Thornton 



Albert Martin 
Weslaco 



Fred McKenzie 
Uvalde 



Harry Moore 
Cuero 



'"i'll^lf 




Harold Kuykendall 
Emhousc 



Ei.vA Rhea Lawhon 
Taylor 



LiLLiE Mae Logan 

Georgetown 



Morgan Manford 
Hoiistoit 



Maurice Monroe 
lou'ij Park 



Margaret Morriss 
Hoii5to» 



Page S.' 



n.^. 



i.'i- 



C. Herman Murph 
Goose Creek 



Elizabeth Newberry 

Onhualma, Mexieo 



Eleanor Osirom 
Corpus Chnsti 



WiLLARD PeTERMANN 

Beaumont 



Henry Price 
Georgetown 



GOLDIE PuRCELL 

Georgetown 




Kathleen Neal 
Georgetown 



Mary Emma Neyland 
Jasper 



Frances Perrin 
Gforectou'ii 



Bessie M. Pivito 

Beaumont 



Louis Price 
Georgetown 



Evelyn Ransom 

Richmond 



^ 



Fage S3 



/ \ 






JW 



i:t>r 



Lowell Ryan 

Lytton Springs 



Josephine Shannon 
Wharton 



Phil Shrader 

Raymondinllc 



Carl Sohns 
Tlwrnialc 



Virginia Stewart 

Venioii 



Conn Thomas 
Shiro 



\'"^\ 



=.1 




Ruth Searls 
Sulphur Springs 



Marie Shannon 
Ru'limoiiJ 



Gladys Simpson 
Corpus Clrnsti 



Annie Dee Smith 
Atlanta 



Bill Stokes 

jarrell 



Marion Thomas 
A)uicrson 



Page 84 



/i^i 



Jack Todd 
Kossc 



Lucille Waite 
Georgetown 



George Walton 
Lampasas 



Carrie L. Weatherby 
Roschuii 



Daveine Wilcox 
Georgetown 



Edna Womack 
Cordis Chnsti 




Byron Votaw 
jarrell 



Paul Wallace 
Beaumont 



Mary B. Ware 
Dallas 



Eunice Wiemers 
Georgetoii'n 



Arline Willett 
Hiimliii 



Smoot Whigham 
Georgetown 



I 



) \ 



Page 85 



riA 



For Davine 



f 



:nii!Ji' 



That smile! how well we all remember it, 

As passing us she waved a lifted hand 

And called a happy greeting. Never planned 

Or studied was her cheerfulness; no whit 

Of insincerity. Oh, just a bit 

Of sunshine was her face! To understand 

Why she is gone — we cannot. How the Hand 

That made her dancing eyes should now see fit 

To take her from us, baffles all our thought. 

We vainly weep and now and then repeat 

Something she said or did in her sweet way. 

But through the tears this lesson she has brought 

To countless lives who realize today 

How much one does by simply being sweet. 



March 24, 1932 



-Aninc Edward Barcus 




Page- S6 




FRESHMEN 



J^ 







Garrison 



Phares 



Van Ness 



Freslinian Class Officers 



■|1 



J. L. Garrison 
Winston Proctor 
Ruth Lee Jones 



FALL TERM 



President 

Vicc'Prcsiicnt 

SccrcUnyTrcasunr 



Gil Phares 

MORLEY GiDDlNGS 

Katherine Browning 



WINTER TERM 



President 

VicC'Praiclciit 

SccrctaryTrcdsurcr 






SPRING TERM 



Joseph Van Ness 
Jessie W. Stuart 
Mary Martha Black 



lA 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Page 



/7.4, 



Jack Adams 

Georgetown 



James Asher 
Georgetown 

Elizabeth Atkinson 
Kenedy 



Lelia Lee Batte 
Cameron 



Lula Ruth Bell 

Pharr 

Leroy Berkman 
Georgetown 



Mary Martha Black 
Bryan 




Sydney Adams 

Waco 

Sara Moore Anderson 
Cleveland 



Dorcas Batte 

Cameron 



Lyndoll Galbreath 

Libert)' Hill 

Floy Beard 

GolJtllU'cIltC 



Ellienora Birkelbach 
Tlinill 



Sterling Bowman 
Uvalde 

Elwood Brewer 
Coleman 



Fage Hy 



rr 






Jack Burcham 
Gfortjctoicii 



Elizabeth Caldwell 

SoiUTi) 

Coleman Carpenter 
Woco 



Halley Cooper 
Gcorgctoii'H 



Bert Crawford 
Victoria 

Harvey Cross 
San Antoino 



Joe Davis 

GiorgzXown 




Virginia Burns 
Corsicana 

Brownie Byfield 

LIcIMO 



Cecile Cooke 
Gcorgiiovon 



William Cox 

HoH5tOH 

Dolly Cox 

Bay City 



Clinton Crouch 

Soiraloga 



Lucille Dalchau 
CalJu'cII 

Pearl Dalchau 
Cartel I 






IJ^ 



Page fio 



//4 



Lavinia Davis 

UvaUc 



Bruce Day 
Harlingcn 

?eal Duncan 
Waco 



Elmer Erwin 
Gipc Gnaricau, Mo. 



Martin Fakior 
El Campo 

Duskie Ann Few 
Huii(5rillc 



Esther Myrle Franks 
San Antomo 




Melvin Davis 
Florence 

Ruth Davis 
Gcorgftoicn 



Will Paxton Ellis 

Laredo 



Homer Evans 
Georgetown 

Garland Fairchild 
Bi.rL- 



Glenn Fikes 
Sail Antonio 



Fred Gage 
Aijdin.si'illc 

JiLLIE GaITHER 

Cameron 



I 



ol. 



Page 9/ 



/» ,j ""4 



James Garrison 
Beaumont 



Charles Gillespie 
Biirtlilt 

Jack Godbey 

Georgetown 



Mabel Lee Hall 
Georgetown 



Maurine Harris 

Elgin 

Donald Hicks 
El Cam^o 



Kermit Horn 

Mcxia 




Martha Gholson 
Ranger 

Marley Giddens 

Georgetown 



Waldo Haisley 

SlIllOH 



Frances Hamblen 
Holland 

Alice Ma ye Harris 
Georgetown 



Faye Hobdy 
HcimiltoFi 



Louise Hornbuckle 
Tnint)' 

Elizabeth Howard 
Georgetown 



i J- 



Page p-' 



"? ••-TT 



ii'h 



Lola Fay Hunt 
Porthnd 



Reese Jennings 
Kerens 

Ruth Lee Jones 
Galveston 



Harriette Lawhon 
Moody 



Lillian Kiker 
Bronte 

Reuben Landrum 

Lamj}asas 



Thomas P. Lee 

Houston 



( , 




Harold Jackson 
Hiirliiicjcii 

Darold )ackson 

HarliH(;fii 



Charles Judkins 
Ali'ui 



Melvin Kay 
HargiU 

Robert Keen 



Mitchell Lldinski 
Smitlu'illc, Okla. 



Fred Leigh 

Howard Lindell 
Georgetown 



Ji 



Page 93 



//a 



Wilbur Love 
Florence 



Herman McDonald 
UvaUc 

Cutler McLean 
Georgetown 



Ella L. Meissner 
Thornddlc 




Dorothy Moore 
Hoii.stoii 



Martha E. Lindsey 
Lliiiio 

Mary Pearl McCluney 
Kerens 



Dorothy May 
Georgetown 



Ethel Mae Mondrick 
Gi III fron 

Marjorie Menefee 

AlLStlll 



Jewel Moore 



I^K Jf^ ^ '■ 


HoiLStOlI ; 


Bi^ ^^^^ 1 




m^ 


1 


IFl 


NiEI S NiLSON 


H^^^l 


Gtlll'C5t011 


^^h! 


Nelita Neyland 


H|H 


i 




c 



Page 94 



'4 



Dorothy Nichols 
Roliitou'ii 



Aubrey Patton 
McAIIm 

Ruth Peterson 
Ba.strop 



Mrs. Eva Porter 
Waco 



HiLMA Rogers 
Dallas 

Roy Richardson 
Georgetown 



Knox Robertson 

Wadicr 




G. C. Parrish 
Uvalde 

Alice Parker 
Corsuana 



Gil Phares 



Winston Proctor 

BccIU 1110)1 1 

Joe Ramirez 

La Bliinca 



VVoodrow Roark 
Thorndalc 



John Miles Rowlett 
Georgetown 

Imogene Sapp 
Cameron 



i 



IL 



^ \ 



Page 95 



f'(A 



:-,n' 



Sherline Schuessler 
CasuU 



Marjorie Nei.l Sherman 
Gcorgctowi\ 

Robert Stallings 
Houston 



Harriett Stone 
Gcorgciown 



Alice Swan 


■K 


■-m 


mi 


[. 


HolLinJ 


K 




z.. ' 




N English Thames 


r 




% 




Kcnaly 


i;- 


•■-^ 


"^^ 


1 



Margaret Tisdale 
Eldorado 





Felix B. Secrest, Jr. 
Georgetown 

John M. Sharpe, Jr. 
Georgetown 



Mary Stevens 
Cooixr 



Jesse Weed Stuart 
Bciiumoiit 

Kindred Stubblefield 
BlooiMiiigtoii 



Emma Howard Thomas 
Ganse 



Joseph Van Ness 
Bel ton 

Dow Wallace 
Georgetoum 



Page f)6 



IH 



Harney Watts 

7 a\fa 



James White 
Beaumont 

Jim Whigham 
McAlln. 



Franklin Yeager 
Corpus ClirKsti 



Garrett Nalley 
Talpc 

Laverne McAfee 
Kcrms 




Pauline Waterman 
Pura 

Lillian Webb 
OJnii 



Dorothy B. Wilkes 
Llijiio 



Donald Hudgins 
HmigcrforJ 

Kathrine Browning 
YoiiLiiin 



Thelma Slocum 
Pluirr 



Ernest Armstrong 
Hcbhroiu'illt 



Page 97 



/!A 



Amille Watson 
FlorciKC 




Margaret Hanchey 
San Bcynto 




Page f)S 




In the autumn of 1735 Wesley landed on the shores of 
Georgia. As VVhitefield says: " Mr. Wesley's name is very 
precious among the American people and he has laid a 
foundation that neither men nor angels will ever be able 
to shake." 






ACTIVITIES 



^prrr 



''^ 



:l, I 



■/ll 






tm 



M'l 



I,.'' II;, !.r 




publication; 



'C': 



fl^\ 





Wesley Boothe, EJitur in Cliuf 



Milton Gray 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Maurice Monroe 
|. Link Baker 
Dorothy Bryan 
Eli Aronson 
Ralph Huitt 
Bill Dunn 
Bert Crawford 



W. G. Elzner, BiLsiikis Milliliter 

A.s5i5tiiMt EJitor 

Snap Sliot Editor 

Class Editor 

Ewtiirc' Editor 

Art Editor 

Asiistciiit Bn,siMcs5 Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 




Top roic: Milton Gray, Evelyn Raetzsch, Maurice Monroe, Dorqthv Bryan, 
Bottom roiD: Eli Aronson, Ralph Huitt, J. L. Baker, Bill Dunn. 



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3iLL Murray, EJilor m Cliuf 



Glvnim Terry, Biiiiiu'ss Manai'cr 



The Megaphone is the weekly publication of Southwestern University and 
under the managership of Bill and Glynn it has come to be one of the outstand- 
ing college weeklies in Texas. It has covered all phases of college activities 
and has been interesting at all times. Much credit should be given to these 
two boys for their splendid work, for they have made the paper a success even 
though a depression was m full sway. 




"A. 



Top imi': Raetzsch, McAuliffe, Huitt, Nael, Driskiil, Bryan, Boothe. 
Boltoin row: Crawford, Clark, Moore, Foster, Ervin, Still, Binion. 



"^ 



Page 103 



,7,.\ 







Carter Fuller, Eifilor in Chief 



W. R. Stump, Biisincsj Manager 



The Magazine is published monthly by the Student Association and serves 
the purpose of publishing articles written by students who are talented in the 
field of writing. This year the Magazine was a publication well worth while 
anci revealed some talent of which Southwestern can be proud. 




Toy row: Whiteside, Stubberfield, Haislev, Parker, Howard, Ostrom, Clark, Sapp, Ware, 
Bi'lloiH roll': Bishop, Neai , French, Flowers, Ferguson, Ferguson, Ferguson, Martin, Day. 



Page 104 



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Ttie Students' Association 



The Students' Association of Southwestern University comprises every 
regularly registered student in residence at the institution. The constitution 
of the Association includes provisions for the organization, officers, officers of 
student publications, executive committee, nominating committee and the 
honor system. • 

The officers of the Stucients' Association this year, P. G. Secrest, Burgin 
Dunn, and Evelyn Raetzsch have performed their tasks well and much praise 
and credit is due them lor this noble work. Under their administration the 
many problems of the Association have been solved easily and quickly. 



Y' 



Page Jc6 





"T(>{' row: TiPioN, Fi:i i lr, Baskin. 

BtflloiM row: Fri;Drick, Gray, Bryan, Boothe. 



Executive Committee 



/ 



The Executive Committee is elected the first two weeks of school by the 
Students' Association of Southwestern University and the purpose of such a 
committee is to serve as a body of people to solve the problems of the students. 

, The committee this year has functioned well, submitting amendments to the 
constitution and discussing the many and various problems of the different 
organizations on the campus. 

Provisions are made for its functions and authority in the constitution of the 
Students' Association. 



Fagc 107 



rw 



(Ta 




Tdji vow. Cortes, Gould, Dunn, Hardin. 

B(i||(iiii roir: Oatman, Baker, Buchhoiz, Lawhon, McKenzie. 



University Honor Council 

The University Honor Council is that body which governs the University 
Student Body in its disciplinary problems. It has jurisdiction over all matters 
pertaining to the students while not in either of the dormitories. 

The Council is composed of nine members, four seniors, three juniors and two 
sophomores, which members are elected by their respective classes the first 
class meeting of the year. This method of election has proven highly successful 
because the best material available is obtained. 

This year the Honor Council has proven efficient, capable and prompt in its 
actions. It has done the right things at the right time and because of this 
Council the disciplinary problems have been handled nobly. 



Page loS 





Top row: Studer, Aronson, Dunn, Whittle. 
Biittdiii row: Taveor, Terry, Czarowit:, Baker. 



!i 






Mood Hall Honor Council 



The Mood Hall Honor Council is a body of men elected by the men of the 
Hall for the purpose of governing them according to the laws as set forth in the 
constitution of the boys' residence. This year the Council performed its duty 
with the idea in mind of doing the right thing at the right time and for the good 
of all persons concerned in the matter. 

Due to the efforts of this body of able-bodied men, the living conditions of 
the dormitory have been improved and a better understanding between the 
boys has been established. 



I 






Page icxj 




.X 




Toy nnu- Ostrom, Raeizsck, Hardin, Haag, |. Shannon, Mings. 
BdIIoiu row: Heath, Sneed, Ross, Karbach, Howeli., Swinnea. 



Woman's Biiilding Honor Council 



The Woman's Building Honor Council is composed of twelve members 
elected by the girls living in the Woman's Building. This Council has juris- 
diction over the problems confronting the girls living there. 

The Council this year has been very active and they have done the things 
which are best for the group in place of the individual. Because of this pro- 
gram of action a better understanding between the different organizations 
within the Woman's Building has been attained. 



Page Jio 



a 




Tii(' row. Ellis, Ware, Silibbleiield, Richardson, Lawhon, Black, Sneed. 

Second row: Watson, Lindsay, Nielson, May, Gillespie, Hunt, Davis, Wilkes. 

Bolloiti row Webb, McLean, Caldwell, Hornbuckie, Watts, Crouch, Towi ett, Roberts. 



anish Club 



OFFICERS 



Will Patton Ellis 
Mary B. Ware 
Kindred Stubblefield 
Roy Richardson 
Harriet Lawhon . 



President 

VuT-Prcsiclc'iit 

Rtf'orttT 

Bus 111 CSS Manager 

Treasurer 



The Spanish Club is a club composed of those students who are interested in 
Spanish and who v^^ant to gather the benefits which come from meeting in mutual 
aid and discussions. 

The Spanish Club meets once a month and the programs which are rendered 
are highly beneficial to the students who attend those meetings. 



Fage ill 




T.if roil'. FuM-ER, Hodges, Baker, Ferguson, Fe.^guso.n, Fe.\guso,n, Secrest, Rumble, Stump, Butler. 
Saoiiif roil': Rav, Wisdom, Davidson, Vivion, Quebedeau.x', Cotton, Howard, Hereford, Hutton, Tipton. 
Biilloiii roil': Campbell, Richardson, Dickens, Nall, Gorzvcki, Kiloore, McAuliffe, James, Bohmfalk, Swinnea. 



1 



cliolarsMp Society 



( 



"Yfiluill L'liinr till' Iriilli ciiiil llii- (riilli sliiill maVc yon jrcc" 

Carter B. Fuller ...... PrcsiJciit 

W. R. Stump VurPrcsulcnt 

Lucille Hodges ....... SccnUnyT^ rcasurcr 

W.P.Davidson ...... Faculty AJi'isor 

Claude Howard ....... Fflciilty AJiusor 

E. H. Hereford ...... . Faculty AJi'isor 

The Southwestern University Scholarship Society is the mother chapter of the Scholarship 
Societies of the South, whose purpose is defined as "the stimulation, development, and 
recognition of scholarship and those elements of character that make scholarship eftective for 
good." 

Any student in the ranking ten per cent of the junior or senior class is eligible for member- 
ship upon the approval of the faculty and of the society. 

It IS the custom of the Society to award, at commencement, a fine dictionary to the freshman 
attaining the highest scholastic average for the entire year. Each year also a speaker is invited 
t3 address the student body on some phase of scholarship. The speaker chosen for this year, 
to speak on the great German poet, Goethe, is Dr. A. H. Nolle, Dean of Southwest Texas 
Stat; Teachers College. 



^^ 



Pane J 12 



'd '^ 




Top nm-. Monroe, Huitt, Boothe, Thomas, Sohns. 
Boltom row Brown, Son, Burcham, Roark, Ledinski. 



Intercollep:iate Debaters 



T. C. U 3 Southwestern 

Trinity 2 Southwestern 1 

St. Edwards 2 Southwestern 1 

Southwest S. T. C Southwestern 1 

Southwest S. T. C 1 Southwestern 2 



The question for debate this year is the Pi Kappa Delta question which is: 
Resolved that congress should enact legislation providing for the centralized 
control of industry. This question has proven to be very interesting and the 
boys composing the debating squad have enjoyed the course very much because 
of the timely question. Five teams represented Southwestern and each team 
has won one debate. As the annual goes to press the debating season is just 
getting started and before the year is out we will find that Southwestern will 
have won a large portion of its debates. 



) i. 



Page II J 



//■- \ 




Tke Mask and Wig Players '- 

The Mask and Wig Players, under the direction of Mr. Ernest R. Hardin of the Speech De' 
partment, have had a remarkably successful year. The Mask and Wig Players of Southwestern 
are members of National Collegiate Players, a national honorary dramatic fraternity which 
goes by the Greek letters Pi Epsilon Delta. 

The players produced the following nve-act play during the Fall term, "Ten Nights in a Bar- 
Room." The Christmas play, "Following the Star," was given at the church by the players. 

The winter offering was "Mcrton of the Movies," with Milton Gray and Dorothy Bryan 
taking the leads. 

The spring production was Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" with Eddie Mae Clark and 




^a. 



Page 114 



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The Mask and Wig Players 

Carter Fuller taking the leads. 

Those composing the present Mask and Wig Group are: Lena Baskin, H. W. Cortes, Ruby 
Cooper, Carter Fuller, Louise Harding, Willie Lee Heath, Beattv Oldham, Dancan White- 
side, Billy Stump, Evelyn Raetzsch, Milton Gray, Sidney Adams, Eleanor Ostrom, Eddie Mae 
Clark, Ralph Huitt, Mable D. Nail, Fred McKenzie, Seth Dorbandt, G. C. Parrish, Dorothy 
Bryan, A. C. Hart, Gladys Simpson, Mary Belle Batte, W. W. Roark, A. B. Martin, D. E. 
Kinney, Elmer Erwin, Mary Emma Neyland, Bill Dunn, Bergin Dunn, Chernlle DeBardeleben, 
Herman Murf, Winston Proctor, Leslie McDanicl, William Murray, Mary Emmerson Sparger, 
Edith Foster and Francis Mood. 





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Page 115 



f!.\ 




Top row: Wisdom, Godbey, Tinslev, Wapple, Guthrie. 

MiiJiJIr vow: Secrest, Dunn, Richardson, Swinnea, Davis, Gorzycki. 

Bottom row: McAuliffe, Buchholz, Stump, Simpson, Ullrich, Wallace. 



icience Society 



The Science Society is an organization which is composed of those students majoring in 
science and who have an average above eighty-five. This year the society has had regular 
meetings which have proven beneficial and interesting to the members. Regular meetings are 
held and at those meetings timely and interesting subjects are discussed. 

Under the leadership of Dr. Godbey the members have had the privilege of listening to dis- 
cussions which will long be remembered by those attending the meetings. 



Page Ii6 



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The Pirate Band is the official Southwestern University Band, representing the University 
upon such occasions as football and basketball games. The band also makes numerous trips 
in the spring, playing formal concerts in different sections of the country. 



The personnel of the band is as follows: 

Dirtifor: Robert fi. Simpson 



Trumpet; 

James White 
BuRGiN Dunn 
W. W. Chapman 
J. L. Watson 
Harold Jackson 
Gil Phares 

Troitil'OMc: 

Phil Shrader, Mgr. 
Roy Richardson, Jr. 
James Whigham 

B.15.S: 

A. C. Hart 
Eugene Wiemers 
-" Dr. E. H. Hereeord 



Cliiruift: 

Joseph McAuliffe 
James Lancaster 
Bill Murray 
Charles Kellogg 
Jesse W. Stuart 
Bruce Day 
Daroi d Jackson 

Alto Horn: 

William Ellis 
Waldo Haisley 
Ben Bohmfalk 

BiintoMC 

James Asher 
Birney McLaughlin 



Sflioplioiic: 

Jack Crawford 
LoRNE Hamme 
John Rowlett 
Cutler McLean 

Flute: 

Paul Wallace 

Oboe: 

Ellis Wood 

Drums: 

Ralph Huitt 
J. D. Douthitt 




fayc ny 



■I 




The Vikings 



The versatile Vikings under the leadership and direction of Dr. E. H. Here- 
ford are a group of our leading musicians who perform under the baton of con- 
ductor Ellis Wood. While the organization is new Mr. Wood has brought 
them to a very high state of musical perfection and they are much in demand 
throughout central Texas. 



The personnel is as follows: Ellis Wood, conductor, oboe, saxophone, clarinet; 
Joseph McAuliffe, saxophone and clarinets; Paul Dornbluth, saxophone, clarinet, 
vocalist; Robert H. Simpson, trumpet, alto horn; Burgin Dunn, trumpet, 
vocalist; Phil Shrader, trombone; Waldo Haisley, cello, alto horn; Niels 
Nilson, piano; Paul Wallace, flute; William P. Murray, violin, clarinet, saxo- 
phone; Ralph Huitt, drums; A. C. Hart, bass, trombone, baritone; E. H. Here- 
ford, manager, bass. 



Page iiS 



/ r. 




Back row: Wood, Stubbelfield, Korges, Johnson, Tipton, Weimers, Keeloo, Wallace, Dalchau, E. Wood. 
Middle roiv: Hall, Ray, Edwards, Simpson, Diets, Neae, Johns, Dalchau, Seocum. 
Front row: Henley, Saathoff, Roberts, Franks, Schuessler, Karbach, Adams. 



Ch 



orus 



The Southwestern University Chorus is one of the best known organizations 
on the campus. Besides this it is one of the best choruses in the state. From 
time to time throughout the school year the chorus makes trips to different 
parts of the state and each time it meets with the approval of all those who 
attend the concerts. 



/•'• 



One of the features of this organization is the annual Music conference which 
Southwestern sponsors in co-operation with the chorus. At this Music Con- 
ference the chorus gives a concert which is one of the most noted attractions on 
the conference program. 



progr 



\. 



^ 



fagc ng 



J - :-r- , ^ J i 




Top rou-. )ames, Clark, Karback, Tipton, DEBARDtLEBEN, Stewari. 
Biillom i(Hi': Simpson, Womack, Ostrom, Howell, Morris, Bryan. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Eunice James 
Eddie Mae Clark 
Marjorie Karback 
Ruth Tipton 
Cherille DeBardeieben 
Virginia Stewart 
Gladys Simpson 
Edna Womack . 
Eleanor Ostrom . 
Thomasine Howell 
Margaret Morris 
Dorothy Bryan 



President 
. VicrPrcsuJtiit 

Prograitus 
. RctTcatioii 

Recreation 
. Mcititcrsliip 

Music 
. Music 

Social Service 
. Sarciary 

Treasurer 
. Piiblicit)' 



^.! 




The Y. W. C. A. this year has added many new features to its program and 
each added attraction has proved highly successful and interesting. It 
has kept the idea in mind of developing the higher idealism of the Women of 
Southwestern. , . 



I 



Page 120 



/(4 




Top Toiv: Murray, Terry, Aronson, Whittle. 
Bottdiii lou': BooTHE, Dunn, Fairchuds, Bennett. 



Y. M. C. A. 



Bill Murray 


. Prcsuifiit 


Glynn Terry 


Vut-Pn-.siJiiit 


Eli Aronson 


. Secretary 


Clyde Whittle 


CluiiDiiiiii oj" Finance' CoiniHitta' 


Wesley Boothe 


. Cluiiriiuiii of Sotuil C()nnnittt't' 


Bill Dunn 


Cluiiriiiaii 0/ Program Committee 


Monroe Fairchilds 


. Cluiirnuiii of Hiill Coininitta- 


George Bennett 


Chairman 0/ Rtli^iou.s Attirity Co nun it tec 



This year the Y. M. C. A. has launched a new program, that of stressing the 
three phases of the triangle; namely, spiritual, educational, and physical side 
of the boy's life. The stress has not been on either sicfe but has been a unity 
of all three into a well balanced life. The programs were on problems which 
confront all college men. The change proved to be very beneficial. 



'--■^ ."» 



Faijc 12! 





Top roil': BoHMFALK, Coleman, Pittman, Conerly, Pledger, Ledinski, Hamilton. 

Middle row: Judkins, Westbrook, Kendred, Bennett, Gunn, Hahn, Jordan. 
Bottom roiv: Lowry, Dubberly, Dunn, Wood, Duncan, Watts, Dubberlv. 



Tke Ministerial Association 



The purpose of the Ministerial Association is to unite those students who 
are preparing to engage in some form of rehgious work, especially the ministry, 
for mutual eciification and service to humanity. 

The Association meets once a week, together with the other Life Service 
Volunteers, for devotional meetings at which talks are made by members of 
the Association or by someone whose experience may prove beneficial to the 
group. 

Members of the Association preach every Sunday at nearby churches. They 
have accomplished noteworthy results at the church at the North Side of town. 
The Association has made considerable progress during this year, with worth- 
while results. 




Page /-' 



Ih^ 



I 




Top roil': GoRzvCKi, Caldweu., Lindskv, Nicholson, Dalchau, Kiker, French. 
Botltfiii roil'. Moore, Adams, Webb, Rumbee, Ceark, Schuesseer, Franks. 



I 



Student Volunteers 



The Student Volunteers is a group of students organized for the purpose of 
bringing about a better feeling of understanding among those students who are 
entering into the Missionary held of activity in the Methodist Church. They 
have regular meetings in conjunction with the Ministerial Association and the 
Life Service Band. These organizations meet every Sunday in the Fine Arts 
auditorium. 

The organization under the leadership of Miss Lillian Gorzycki has accom- 
plished many worth while things and the continuous growth ot this organi- 
zation proves that fact. 




Fauc 13} 



Ml 




f-i^._. 



^>as 




Toj) row. Dunn, Aronson, H. Mocre, Clark, Dunn. 

Bottom roiv: Conerly, Bennett, Duncan, Simpson, Rumble, DeBardeleben. 



Yomig Peoples' Department 



Charles Rumble 

Eli Aronson 

Cherille DeBardeleben 



President 

Vicc'Prcsiicnt 

SccrctaryTrcasurcr 



With the passing of a new law m Methodism concerning the young peoples' work the whole 
system had to be reorganized, consequently the University students organized the system so 
that It would be in co-ordination with the Methodist Church. The Young Peoples' Department 
under the leadership of Charles Rumble has proven as effective if not more so than the old system 
and much credit and praise is due him and his cabinet for the wonderful work done the past 
school year. 




Page J24 



PB 




fraternitie: 

and 
SORORITIES 



-^n 




Top row. CoiiTES. Terry, Weir, Allen, Harris. 
Boltdiii row. Fredrick, Thomas, Stinchcomb, Brent, Dunn. 



a 



Founded, 1865, Washington and Lee University 
Colors: Crimson and Gold Floicir: Magnolia and Red Rose 



J. McCc 



FRATRES IN URBE 
D. K. Carter 



W. R. Mood 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



/ 



H. W. Cortes 
Glynn Terrv 
Howard Weir 



Chester Allen 
James Harris 
Charles Fredrick 



\ , 



v. 



I 



Page 126 



//4 




Top roil": Pennington, Lunsford, Dunn, Smith, Phares. 
Bollom row: Lindell, Patton, Yeager, Erwin, Haisi.ey. 



I. J. McCoOK, Aliiiiimi5 Aill 

M\Ri3N Thomas 
Bluford Stinchcomb 
Robert P. Brent 
BuRGiN Dunn 
Cecil Pennington 



Xi Installed 1883 

PLEDGES 
Claude Lunsford 
Bill Dunn 
William M. Smith 
Gil Phares 



R. W. TiNSLEY, Faculty Adi 

Howard Lindell 
Aubrey Patton 
Franklin Yeager 
Elmer Erwin 
Waldo Haisley 




Mrs. Nalley 



faije 127 







To^' row. Oatman, Stump, Secrlst. W. M. Richardson, Sterling, Day. 
Bottom roii;: Huitt, W. Davis, Martin, B. Davis, Laird, DeWitt, McDaniels. 



Pki Delta Tteta 






Founded, 1848, Miami University 
Colors: Argent and Azure Flower: White Carnation 

FRATRES IN URBE 
D W. Wilcox Sam Stone 

R. L. Logan Walter Young 

D. K. Wilcox 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
King Vivion H. L. Gray 

W. C. Vaden L. 1. Waggoner 

P. P. Young 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

WiLBURN Oatman, Jr. Ralph Huitt 

William Stump , Warren Davis 

P. G. Secrest, Jr. A.B.Martin 

Will Mann Richardson ' Barton Davis 

Fred Sterling Sam Laird 

Edwin Day Gil DeWitt 
Moran McDaniel 



Page J-'S 



li-\ 



.<;: 




Top nnv\ Patterson, Bolion, Crawford, Elzner, Petermann, Williams. 
Bottom rou': Brown, Secrest, White, Proctor, Richardson, Rowlett. 

Phi Delta Tlieta 



WiLLARD Petermann 
Dave Williams 
Winston Procter 
James White 
Marshall Bolton 
Roy Richardson 



Texas Gamma Installed 1886 

PLEDGES 
Ralph McAfee 
Earnest Armstrong 
John Miles Rowlett 
Eet IX B. Secrest 
David Kinney 



Whitlow Elzner 
WooDROw Patterson 
Kenneth Crawlord 
Warren Brown 
BiLi, Stokes 
Gi ynn Eikes 




Fagc !2<) 



"i 




Top 1(111' BucHHOLZ, Gray, WHiitsiut, Doknbluih, Binion 
Botfoiii loic: Price, Kurth, Dorbandt, Moore, Bledsoe. 



KapDa Sio:iiia 



Founded at University of Virginia, 1869 
Colors: White and Emerald Green Flower: Lilv of the Vallev 



S. A. Hodges 
M. F. Smith 



FRATRES IN URBE 



F. C. Smith 



C. H. Harris 

O. W. Cardwell 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Ransom Buchholz • - Clayte Binion 

Milton Gray Louis Price 

Duncan Whiteside Roy Kurth 

Paul Dornbluth Harry Moore 



Page J30 



n.A 




Curtis Gunn 
Mack Buckaloo 
W. R. Cox 
Jack Todd 



Toj.' row. Gunn, Buckaloo, Cox, Todd, Wacklr. 

Bottom ?-oii': BuRCHAM, Allen, Hudgins, Stuart, Leigh. 



a Digma 

Iota Installed 1886 

E. L. Hardin, Fnifcr iii Facuhatc 

PLEDGES 

Arthur Wacker 
Jack Burcham 
Harrv Allen 
Donald Hudgins 



J 



W. Stuart 
Fred Leigh 
MuRF Bledsoe 
Seth Dorbandt 



(f- 




Page 131 



/ / \ 




Top row. Murray, Hamme, Seamans, Driskill, Story, Price. 
Bottom row: Gee, Boothe, L. Hamme, McKenzie, Taylor, Thomas. 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



Founded, May 1, 1869, University of Virginia 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Floii'ir. Lily of the Valley 

FRATRES IN URBE 
Buster Langford Ed. Franklin 

Thatcher Atkins 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 
C. M. Edens 



i 



/' X 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
W. P. Murray F. A. Mood 

Ralph tiAMME ' Henry Price 

B. G. Story C.H. Lee 

Frank Driskill Vance Seamans 



^2^ 



Page 13 



iR 




Top row. Monroe, Baker, Keene, Oldham, Smith, Collins. 
Bottom roic: Whigham, Boman. Crawford, Parrish, Lee, Robertson. 



Pi Kappa Alpka 

Alpha Omicron Established November 10, 1910 



PLEDGES 




J. L. Baker Fred McKenzie W. W. Roark 

J. W. BooTHE Maurice Monroe T. P. Lee 

Marlin Brockett G. C. Parrish Smoot Whigham 

Sterling Bowman Knox Robertson Spruce Keene 

Victor Collins Reagan Taylor Beatty Oldham 
LoRNE Hamme Conn Thomas 



Mrs. Mood 



I 



i'age 133 




Top row. Ross, Isaacs. 

Bottdiii niu': Howell, Edwards, Lanier, Nfll Harris. 



PM Mu 



Founded, 1852, Macon, Georgia 



Colors: Old Rose and White 



Flower: Enchantress Carnation 



PATRONESSES 



Mrs. Lee Hall 
Mrs. G. C. Hester 
Mrs. Joe McInnis 
Mrs. S. T. Atkins 
Mrs. R. L. Galloway 
Mrs. E. M. Chreitzberg 
Mrs. Robert Isaacs 



Mrs. F. D. Love 
Mrs. M. L. Williams 
Mrs. Bessie Stancell 
Mrs. Stiles Byron 
Mrs. a. C. Brizendine 
Mrs. a. Harris 
Mrs. p. B. Branch 



Johnnie Ross 
Lucinda Mae Isaacs 
Thomasine Howell 



sorores in UNIVERSITATE 

Ella V. Lanier 
Elizabeth Edwards 
Nell Harris 



Page 134 



ihh 




Top roil': Logan, Purcell. 

Bottom row: Wilkes, Tisdale, Harris, Alice Maye Harris. 



Pki Mu 



ToHNNih Ross 



XI Kappa Installed, 1906 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 
Mrs. Anita Stores Gaedcke 



PLEDGES 




GoLDiE Purcell 
LiLLiE Mae Logan 
Dorothy Belle Wilkes 



Margaret Tisdale 
Maurine Harris 
Alice Maye Harris 




Hagc IS5 



(U 




Top iiHi'. Heath, Hodges, Quebedeaux, Chambers, Still. 
Bolli'iii row. Haag, Foster, DeBardeleben, Casbeer, Nevland. 



Alpka Delta Pi 



Founded, 1851, Macon, Georgia 



Colon . Blue and White 



flower: Violet 



SORORES IN URBE 
Mrs. Roy Richardson 
Mrs. Emmett Cook 
Mrs. Henry Price 
Mrs. Etah Flanagan 
Mrs. Mable Taylor Quebedeaux 
Mrs. "Red" Harris 



Mrs. W. p. Hoffman, Jr. 
Mrs. Walter Young 
Miss Elizabeth Hodges 
Miss Agnes Wilcox 
Miss Molly Davis 
Miss Johnnie Wright 



k 



SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Willie Lee Heath 
Florence Chambers 
Cherrille DeBardeleben 
Edith Foster 



Addilese Haag 
Loraine Still 
Peggy Lusk 
Mary Ruth Casbeer 



Madge Cooper Quebedeaux 



Page 136 




Tcif row. Barron, Lusk, Mings, Gillum, Beli,, Gohlson. 

BoltoiH row. Thomas, Nicholas, Waterman, Black, Atkinson, Nevland. 



a Delta Pi 



Mrs. I. J. McCooK 
Mrs. W. L. Price 




WiETiE Lee Heath 

PROMISES 

Emma Thomas 

Nelita Neyland 

Ruth Bell 

Martha Marie Gholson 

s Dorothy Nichols 

' Frances Hamblin 



PATRONESSES 
Mrs. Conn Foster 
Mrs. Rita McClain 



Irene Mings 
Pauline Waterman 
Mildred Gillum 



Mrs. Harry Dolan 
Mrs. H. N. Graves 



PLEDGES 



Mary Emma Neyland 
Elizabeth Atkinson 
Mary Martha Black 




Where the Alpha Deltas Initiate 



Paye 137 





'|.? :. 



Tiiji rent'.- Hardin, Bryan, Thompson, Sparger, Burnett, Sneed. 
Bultom mil': |o>ins, Wilcox, Young, Prather, Maneord, Mii,ler. 



ieta Tan 



a 



Founded, 1898, Farmersville, Va. 



Colors: Turquoise Blue and Steel Gray 

PATRONESSES 

Mrs. C. S. Griffith 
Mrs. R. a. Nichols 
Mrs. E. G. Gillett 
Mrs. W.J. Davis 
Mrs. W. H. Moses 
Mrs. E. L. Hardin 

SORORES IN URBE 
Mrs. Lawrence Starnes Lorena Moses 

Tula Lee Stone Marie Moses 

Francis Stone Aleen Hardin 



Flou'cr: WhiteViolet 



Mrs. W, G. Johns 
Mrs. D. W. Wilcox 
Mrs. R. J. Stone 
Mrs. W. J. BuRCHAM 
Mrs. W. R. Mood 



Dorothy Mood 
Jenney Davis 
Mary Sue Burcham 



SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Lillian B. Thompson Mary Jane Burnet 

Margaret Sneed ' Louise Hardin 

Dorothy Bryan . Nelda Prather 

Reba Young - Margaret Morriss 

Mrs. Davie Sparger Mary Lucille Miller 

Davine Wilcox Ruth Searls 

Lois Johns ' Helen Woodson 

Mary Emmerson Sparger Thelma Slocum 



Page JsS 



/J 




Top roir: PivOTO, French. Morris, Searls, McClunev, Woodson. 
ButUmi roil': Seocum, Few. Minefee, Gaether. Browning. Davis. 



^eta Tan 



a 



Lambda installed, 1906 




PLEDGES 



Louise Hardin 

PROMISES 

Billy Gaether 

Ruth French 



Bessie M. Pivito 
Morgan Manford 
Lavinia Davis 



Katherine Browning 
Mary Pearl McCluney 
DusKiE Anne Few 




Where the Zetas Initiate 



Fagc 139 



//-A 




Top row: Shannon, Ray, Raetzsch, Baskin, Nall, Batte, Tipton, Kinj;, Stewakt. 

BoltoiM 1011': HicK.s, Lawhon, Korges, Ransom, M. Shannon, Newberry, Snuth, Jones, Rogers. 



Delta Delta Delta 



Founded, 1888, Boston, Mass. 



Colors: Silver, Gold, and Blue 



Flower: Pansy 



Mrs. F. C. Smith 
Mrs. R. L. Logan 



TRI DELTA ALLIANCE 



Mrs. C. O. Beaver 



Mrs. Sam Stone 
Mrs. J. P. Atkin 



SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



^■- 



Lena Belle Baskin 
Mary Belle Batte 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Mabel D. Nall 
Maxine Ray 
Ruth Tipton 
Elizabeth King 
Ruth Lee Jones 



) \ 



Anna Dee Smith 



Evelyn Ransome 
Marie Shannon 
Josephine Shannon 
Elva Rhea Lawhon 
Helen Korges 
Peggy Newberry 
Francis Hicks 
Virginia Stewart 



Page J40 




To{' row: Anderson, Burns, Sapp, Meyers, Hornbuckle, Lawhon, Cox, Hunt, Batte, 

BcXtOMi row: Batte, J. Moore, D- Moore, Hall, Mondrick, Stevens, Byfield, Howard, Sherman. 

Delta Delta Delta 



Theta Epsilon installed, 1911 
SORORES IN FACULTATE 



Miss Laura Kuvkendall 



Miss Pauline Jordan 




PLEDGES 



Sara Moore Anderson 
Dorcas Batte 
Lelia Batte 
Virginia Burns 
Lola Faye Hunt 
Brownie Byfield 



Dorothy Moore 
Jewel Moore 
Frankie Belle Meyers 
Hilma Rogers 
Imogene Sapp 
Mary Stevens 



Josephine Shannon 

PLEDGES 

Harriet Lawhon 

Ethel Mae Monderick 

Louise Hornbuckle 

Elizabeth Howard 

Mabel Lee Hall 

Marforia Nell Sherman 

Dolly Cox 




I 



Whirl thl Tri Dli ts Initiate 



Page 141 



riA 




Top roll'. Hardin. Sparger, Quebedeaux, Heath 
Bottom roil', Ross, Lanier, Ransom, 1. Shannon. 



Woman's Pan-Hellenic 



The Woman's Pan-Hellenic Council, like the Men's Council, is composed of 
two representatives from each of the four sororities on the campus and this 
Council has jurisdiction over the sorority government. 

Each year the Council sponsors a Pan-Hellenic tea which has proven to be 
highly successful anci very beneficial because it brings about a better under- 
standing between the sororities. The tea this year was very successful and 
each person attending the tea enjoyed it very much. 

Besides looking out for the social end of the sorority life, the Council places 
such regulations as it deems advisable for the growth and life of the sororities 
on the campus. 



Page J42 




Top ?c)U': MuRRAv, Hamme, Dornbi hth, Buchholz. 
Bottom roic; Cortes, Terkv, Oatman, Day. 



Men's Pan-Hellenic 



The Men's Pan-Hellenic Council IS composed of two representatives from each 
of the four fraternities on the campus and meets once a month for the purpose of 
discussing the various inter-fraternity problems and making such regulations as 
seem necessary for a better understanding between the different fraternities. 

The organization this year has been very influential in gaining recognition 
from the Administration, having had at different times conferences with the 
various committees concerning the government of fraternities. 



t'ayc I-I3 



fl.x 



Fraternities ' and Sororities 



.X 



On the campus of Southwestern University there e^ist four fraternities, namely: Pi Kappa 
Alpha, Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, and Kappa Sigma; four sororities, namely, Delta 
Delta Delta, Phi Mu, Zeta Tau Alpha, and Alpha Delta Pi. 

The first of these to be organized was the Xi Chapter of Kappa Alpha which was founded 
on November 28, 1883 with six charter members: R. C. Porter, W. C. McKaney, T. L. Crow, 
W. E. Hawkins, E. W. Martin, and E. Embree, jr. 

Several years later the Texas Gamma Chapter of Phi Delta Theta was founded. On March 
12, 1886, A. R.Johns, R. L. Penn, M. K. Pateman, A.J Perkins, W. H. Anderson, J. B. Hawk- 
ins, Abonn Holt, J. E. Quarles, J. H. Williams, R. S. Carter, and S. J. Thomas were granted 
the Charter. 

On October 12, 1886, Iverson B. Love, Jessie C. Baker, Jasper B. Gibbs, and John Stanley 
Moss were granted the Charter for the Iota Chapter of Kappa Sigma which is the twenty-first 
Chapter in American Kappa Sigmas. 

On November 12, 1910, Alpha Omicron Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha was granted a charter 
by the Supreme Council of the Fraternity. The charter members were: A. D. Voight, Samuel 
A. Grogan, C. M. Singleton, J. M. McGuire, M. T. Waggoner, C. D. Chapman, and O. O. 
Mickle. 

May 13, 1906, Lamda Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha was granted a charter. The charter 
members were: Elizabeth Hardy, Bess Whittle, AUie Barcus, Pauline Clark, Jean Whittle, 
Louise Gibson, Rosina Nelson, Rannie Collier, Myrtice Nelms, Lola Branson, Blossom Pitt- 
man, Irene GammiU, Edith Branson, Hazel Whittle, Katherine Fiser, Sunshine Dickerson, 
Bess Bailey, Lena Mae Nelms, Ena Dent, and Clara Wellborn. 

The Zeta Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was not granted its charter until February 1907, al- 
though this organization was the first sorority on the campus. Marv Mann, Nadge Cooper, 
Gladys Graves, Early Price, Gladys Snyder, Martha Sanders, Nannie B. Clamp, Mabel Taylor, 
Gene Daughtrey, Louise Bellford and Catherine Chessleer were the charter members. 

The local Xi Kappa was organized in Southwestern in 1906 but was not chartered until 
May 1, 1908 as the Xi Kappa Chapter of Phi Mu. Thirteen g ds were initiated as charter 
members: Annie Bankright, Mary Inez Coon, Ola Niece, Minnie Taulman, Mabel Daughterty, 
May Hanover, Jessie Sessions, Datherine Howard, AUine Smith, Jimmie Smyth, Berta McKee, 
Eula Rollins, and Julian Mangum. 

The last of the four sororities that are now on the campus to receive their charter was Theta 
Epsilon Chapter of Delta Delta Delta. The charter was granted September 5, 1911, and 
among the charter members were: Madge Hendry, Ann Carter, Ella Sedberry, Bess Crutchfield, 
Sadie Hudson, Hazel Barnes, Cornelia Hightowner, Lucy Agnew, Hallie Crutchfield, Pauline 
Swaftord, Kittie Cain, Norma Smith, Datherine Mitchell, Gladys Lockett. 



Page J44 




John Wesley at all times showed a warm sympathy for 
the power and charm of youthful beauty and affection. 



1 A 


V 


o 


K 


I 


T 


K 


5 








■'•■' V:v--'V;';-'' ,. .'.'V ,■•-' , 





l^lizabetli 
vj-ould 





V irginia 
OteAv^art 




■ "■ — :^ii^ 'm'^m^r^mm'4 




_Louise 
rlardin 





Josepnme 
Snannon 



w 



,1'. H. 



Al^ary Kiiinia 


N 


eylanc 




QJ^ 




Most 


Ivepresentative 




Girl 



^ 





Bill 



M 



tirray 



Most 

Xvepresentative 

Boy 






J onnie 

XV055 

Otalt Favorite 








Xvaetz5cn 

Otall Jr avorite 




It is estimated that in the last fifty years of his Hfe he 
crossed the Irish Channel over fifty times and travelled 
over two hundred and fifty thousand miles. All of his 
journeying up to 1773 was done on horseback. 



S T A D I U M 




i['-' .1: 



'!r 'i'i\: 



'.X 




C. M. EDENS, Coach 

For the past seven years Coach Edens has 
had charge of the athletics at Southwestern and 
as a proof of his success while here, we should 
look into the conference championships he has 
won in football, basketball, track, and base- 
ball. He has won the love, admiration, and 
friendship of all of the students. 



R.J. KIDD.FrcsIn: 



Coacl 



Captain Kidd has been in Southwestern for 
four years as assistant coach but, this being the 
first year for Freshman sports, he has been in 
charge of them, and what success he has had! 
In both basketball and football he has developed 
a team capable of holding its own with the 
best in the state. 



"CHETTER" ALLEN, Football Cafnam 

Under the leadership of "Chetter" the foot- 
ball team had good success. Even though a 
championship was not won, the team always 
fought hard and did its best. 

GEORGE SMITH, BasknhaU Giptdu, 

George, a three-letter man and an all con- 
ference forward, was a capable and efficient 
leader. He always did his best to win and 
usually contributed more than his share to the 
victory. 



fd 



h^ ^ . 



Page 157 









.ii, ■ 



I :,J 







UQ''^ 



Association 



The "S" Association is composed of those men who have earned a letter in 
any of the sports on the campus. It is an organization which promotes sportS' 
manship and tries to develop the physical side of the boy's nature. 



M 



s 



i!'^ 



Page 15S 



//4 




ua 



The Pep Squad is composed of thirty-six girls selected by the yell leaders and they add very 
much to the famous "Pirate pep." The girls this year were: 




Gil DeWitt 



Evelyn Ransom 
Ruth Searls 
Ruth Lee Jones 
Louise FIornbuckle 
Mary Emma Neyland 
Virginia Burns 

LORAINE SlIIl, 

Thomasine Howell 
Margaret Tisdale 
Gladys Simpson 
Dorothy Moore 
Jewel Moore 
Davine Wilcox 
Dorothy Bryan 
Lois Johns 
Edith Foster 
Mildred Gillum 
Elizabeth Howard 



Marjorie N. Sherman 
Thelma Slocum 
DusKiE A. Few 
Mary P. McCluney 
Billie Gaether 
Hilma Rogers 
Frankie B. Meyers 
Mary L. Miller 
Nelda Praether 
Dolly Cox 
Sara M. Anderson 
Margaret Morris 
Nelita Neyland 
Maxine Ray 
Morgan Manford 
Frances Hamblen 
LaVinia Davis 
Cherrille DeBardeleben 



With the leadership of Milton and Gil the 
pep at the football and basket ball games was 
present. These two boys made a grand success 
as yell leaders and much praise and credit is 
due them. 




Mil ION Gr KI 



h' 



Page 159 



/ / - A 



■' 



I ' 1: - 



Trophy Case 



In order to prove to the student body that the Junior class is by far the best class on the campus, 
they purchased something which was long needed by the athletic department of the University — 
a trophy case. Throughout the years Southwestern has won many awards, football, basket- 
ball, baseball, track and tennis trophies, and because there was not an available place to put 
the awards some of them were misplaced. The Junior class had the loyal spirit and did not 
want any more of them misplaced so consequently they bought a beautiful case and presented it 
to the University. 

This case is one of the most beautiful trophy cases in the small colleges within the state. 
The arrangement of the trophies tends to add beauty to the case. It is something that the school 
is proud of and each member of the class should be proud that they had the opportunity of con- 
tributing to this worthy cause. 



Editor's note:- I am indeed sorry that I did not have time to get a picture of the trophy case 
with the trophies arranged in it. 



I'l, ii I 



~\.,- 



I 



;t; U: 



Page 160 




FOOTBALL 




/ \ 



/l, 




Staniiuig: Lawrence, Whittle, Lunsford, Dunn, Brent, Williams, Hamme, McClure. 
Sitting: Johnson, Keene, Forester, Oldham, Gunn, Czarowitz, Laird, Thomas. 
Bottcmi row: Terry, Stinchcombe, Smith. Capt. Allen, Pennington, May, Sterling. 



McMurray 6 Southwestern 7 

Texas A. & M 33 Southwestern 

Sam Houston Southwestern 20 

North Texas S. T. C 25 Southwestern 

St. Edwards 7 Southwestern 13 

Southwest S. T, C 16 Southwestern 9 

Simmons 53 Southwestern 

Austin College 19 Southwestern 13 

Trinity 7 Southwestern 20 

Howard Payne 20 Soutliwestern 



Page J6-' 





I 



I 



SMITH, Full B*L-, \ b5 pomuh. 

George is noted all over the state for his place kick- 
ing ability and has won a number ot games by this 
method. He was selected on the all Conference team 
PENNINGTON. H,,l/ BacV, 141 vowuh. 

Cecil IS one of the best interference runners in the 
conference. Always when he was supposed to take a 
man out he did. He was one of the best half backs in 
the conference and he will be missed very much next 
year. 



ALLEN, CAPTAIN, (-^nter Biuli, liO ivwuh 
"Chetter" made a good leader because he never 
gave up, always fighting until the end. Even though he 
was small he proved that he could stand up under the 
pounding of the much larger men. 

TERRY, Half Back, 155 innimh. 
"Pugy," even though he earned his first letter this 
year, proved that he was a good man He was fast, 
smart, and a hard fighter. 



Paye i6s 



•I,., '■• 




& 



Keene, EhJ, 165 (wmij.s. 
Spruce proved to be one of the best defensive ends 
in the conference. 

LUNSFORD, GiwrJ, l70pouiiJ5. 
Claude was one of the strongest men in the Pirate 
forward wall. 



HAMME, GiuicJ, J65i>ou»Js. 
Ralph always fought his hardest and was a good 
guard. 

WHITTLE, EiuJ, 175|w<Mis. 
Slim proved that he could play football and made a 
success out of it. 



Page 164 







\ 



\ 



FORESTtR, Giuul 165 pomuh. 
"Vic" was a scrapping guard and was selected on 
the all Conference squad. 

GUNN, Half Bac]( , 1 55 pounds. 
"Pop" played his position well and always fought 
his hardest. 



s 



STERLING, TaMc. 1 70 fovmh. 
Fred proved to be one of the best tackles in the con- 
ference even though it was his first year. 

JOHNSON, TaMc, 135 poiuiJs. 
Martin was one of the mainstays in the Pirate line 
and could be depended on to take his man out of the play. 



Page 163 




5^3 



McCLURE.Ed, l65vounh^ 
Jim proved to be one of the best all around men in the 
conference. He could always be depended on to take 
care of his position, 

OLDHAM, C)iMrtcr Back, ]60v'}unds. 
Beatty, although he did not get to play much, proved 
to be very competent and played the position well. He 
is a good punter as well as being a good all around man. 



K4AY, CcnUr, l70pOHiKl.s, 

"CadiUa" was one of the hardest fighters on the 

squad and was always where the fighting was the 

strongest. His position will be hard to fill next year. 

DUNN, Full Back, 170 yomis. 

Bill, even though it was his first year out proved that 

he was good enough to win a letter. Before he finishes 

he will be one of the outstanding men in the conference. 



^ 



Page 166 





#s 






V 



^ 



CZAROWITZ, Full B,k1<, 160,.c.uhJ.s. 
The first year out for Czarowitz proved to Coach 
Edens that he was a hard fighter and a consistent player. 

LAIRD, Giuni, leSi'oimJs. 
For the past two years "OUie" has been one of the 
mainstays on the Pirate wall, and has proven that he is 
one of the best guards on the Conference. 



THOMAS, Qiitn-, nOivunh. 
Tommie failed to letter but even at that he was one of 
the most consistent players on the team. He was very 
dependable. 

BRENT, T.icLL, l65j.ouM.fs. 
Bob's first year out proved to all that he was a player 
of the first class and with a little more experience should 
develop into a polished player. 



I 



iJ= 



Page 16/ 



mamm 



mmm^mmm 



1:1 






|lv 



i iy 



i;v: ;:■ 



\ 0^i f 




LAURENCE, Hal/ Bmlc, 1 75 poumjs 
"Red" was shifted from the line to the backfield this 
year by Coach Edens and this change proved to be the 
right thing because "Red" made a good halfback. 

STINCHCOMB, TaMi, 1,S5 {-oumJs 
"Blue" came to us from Blinn, and made us a valuable 
man because he had fight , grit and a determination to win- 



WILLIAMS, EnJ, 1 70 rounds 
Dave was one of the best ends in the conference. He 
was in every play and the opposition met with much 
difficulty when they tried to move him out. 
WEIR, H.iliB.!ck, 165poui>iis 
"Duddy" was by tar the most consistent performer 
on the Pirate squad. He was a speedy half back who 
always contributed his part. 



Page 16S 



IH 



Season's Revie^^ 



/' 



McMURRAY 0, SOUTHWESTERN 
Opening the season with an experienced crew of Pirates Lefty (Edens') charges held the 
powerful McMurray Indians to a scoreless tie in the first game of the year played under the flood- 
lights on Snyder field. Captain Allen, George Smith, Cecil, Duddy and Stinchcomb were 
the best performers for the canary and black. 

A & M 33, SOUTHWESTERN 
Twice during the first half the Pirate line held the strong cadet team on the one yard line 
for four downs. However, the Pirates could not stand the hard strain caused by the many substi- 
tutes made by the cadet coach and went down in defeat 33-0. Allen, Forester, May, and 
Smith showed the best form for the Pirates. 

SAM HOUSTON 0, SOUTHWESTERN 20 
Completely outplaying the strong teacher aggregation throughout the whole game the smaller 
Pirate machine mowed down its heavier opponents by the one-sided score of 20-0. Duddy, 
George, Forester showed that they could run rings around the supposed-to-be better players. 

ST. EDWARDS 7, SOUTHWESTERN 14 

Opening the conference schedule the Pirates easily outclassed their opponents from Austin 
by the score of 14-7. Throughout the game the boys from Austin put up a noble battle but 
It wasn't good enough to cope with the playing of Lunsford, Stinchcomb, Pennington, Weir 
and Smith. 

N. T. S. T. C. 25, SOUTHWESTERN 

After completely defeating Sam Houston the Pirates went to Denton thinking that it was 
only a matter of a few minutes until they would have another victory chalked up. Due to 
their sureness the Pirates were completely outplayed and consequently went oft the field de- 
feated by the lopsided score of 25-0. 

S. W. S. T. C. 16, SOUTHWESTERN 9 
In one of the most exciting games played on Snyder Field the Bobcats from San Marcos de- 
feated the Pirates by the score of 16-9. A safety and two touchdowns were enough to defeat 
the Pirates. However, the Pirates did not stop fighting until the last whistle had blown. 
Pennington, McClure, Smith, Williams showed to the best advantage for the Canary and Black. 

SIMMONS 53, SOUTHWESTERN 
Completely outclassed and outplayed, the Cowboys from Simmons University ran rough- 
shod over the Pirates. Pee scored almost at will and before the Pirates could stop him he had 
led his team to victory by the score of 53-0. The Pirate backs were unable to get past the line 
of scrimmage very much, only being able to make five first downs. 

AUSTIN COLLEGE 19, SOUTHWESTERN 13 
Traveling to Sherman, the Pirates were confident of victory and met with a big surprise when 
the Kangaroos defeated them 19-13. Not until the last whistle was blown was the outcome 
of the game certain because of the strength of the two teams. 

HOWARD PAYNE 26, SOUTHWESTERN 
In the Turkey Day game the Howard Payne Yellow Jackets again proved to be superior on 
the gridiron and defeated the Pirates 26-0 to gain a tie in the conference race. Worley proved 
to be too much for the Pirate squad. Allen, Forester, May, Smith, Pennington, Wcir, Williams 
all played good ball for the losers. 



Page i6g 



^1 ■ 



(IW 



Y; *■■ 




SliJIuilM^: LiNDELL, Cox, SeCREST, Ji'NNlNUS, RoARK, RamERIZ, EvANS. 

SltlUlg: GODBEV, FlKES, CaPIAIN HoRN, GlDDENS, McAeEE, PrOCTOR , KeENE, PhARES, ArMSIRONU. 



Freshman Schedule 



Allen Academy 19 

State School 7 

State School 12 

Blinn Memorial College 6 

Victoria Junior College 19 



Southwestern 2 

Southwestern 13 

Southwestern 33 

Southwestern 8 

Southwestern 6 



Page 170 




BASKET BALL 



V'V' 




Standing: Brockett, Laurence, Dunn, McKenzie, Thomas, Bucholz 
Sitting: Weir, Taylor, Captain Smith, Seamans. 



Simmons 53 Southwestern 32 

Howard Payne 48 Southwestern 37 

Austin College 41 Southwestern 37 

Southwest S. T. C 25 Southwestern 19 

Southwest S. T. C 37 Southwestern 25 

Austin College 29 Southwestern 34 

St. Edwards 33 Southwestern 35 

St. Edwards 16 Southweatern 30 

Howard Payne 42 Southwestern 36 

Simmons 49 Southwestern 38 



^1,^ 






Page //.' 




n._-L_ji 







CAPTAIN SMITH, F..ru«r,i 
George was one of the leading 
scorers in the conference and besides 
that was one ot the mainstays in the 
Pirate machine. 



We 
Vance 
best. 
f( 



SEAMANS, FormirJ 

could always depend on 
because he always gave his 
He was one of the outstand- 



ing forwards in the conterence 



the 



nfe: 



TAYLOR, CnwrJ 
"Red" for the past two years has 
been one of the mainstays in the 
Pirate machine and his position will 
be hard to fill next year. 



^ 



Page I7i 



•i^'"^ 




BUCHHOLZ, Giwnl \U K t NZil , ( .hm WEIR, Center ami Guari 

Ransom proved that he was a good Another new man who proved Duddy was one of the mam cogs 

basketball man and he always hustled that he was a good basketball player m the machine because he could play 

^\ _ and kept fighting. This was his first and always kept fighting trying to any position and could play it well. 

I year. win for the team. 



4i 




Page J74 





LAURENCE, Guard 
A valuable man and a hard fighter. "Red" always 
gave his best and was always ready to go. 

~\.. DUNN, FonwrcJ 

Burgin fought his hardest at all times and always 
tried his best. 




THOMAS, fonvanl 
Con always was where the battle was the hottest 
and always contributed his part to the team. 
BROCKET!, Fonvari 
Even though small in stature he made up tor it in 
fight. He will be b*ck next year and wdl aid the 
team very much, 



Page 175 



(Pk 



I J.;- 




Standing: Coach Kidd, Godbey, Carpenter, Nalley, Stuart, Parrish, Horn, Erwin. 
Sitting: Evans, Fikes, Giddens, Robertson, Rameriz. 



Freshman Schedule 



i'r,' 




Temple High School 19 

Temple High School 26 

Austin High School '.30 

Austin High School 20 

State School for the Deaf 29 

State School for the Deaf 24 

Blinn Memorial College 40 

Blinn Memorial College 36 

Bryan High School 35 

KerrviUe High School 25 



Southwestern 24 

Southwestern 42 

Southwestern 20 

Southwestern 38 

Southwestern 31 

Southwestern 36 

Southwestern 26 

Southwestern 28 

Southwestern 25 

Southwestern '. . . 35 



Page J76 




TRACK 



yS 



h:r 




Brooks 



M '!■ 



Under the able leadership of Captain Smith, the Pirate track team this year had good success. 
This season developed one of the outstanding dash men in the conference, Murf Bledsoe. Be- 
sides having this man as a member of the squad, the squad had withm it one of the best 440 men 
and relay teams m this section. The first meet of the season, which the Pirates lost by a close 
score, was with Sam fiouston. However, in this meet Captain Smith won two first places, as 
well as did Bledsoe, who defeated Coe of Sam fiouston m both the hundred and two-twenty. 
McKenzie, a freshman, placed in the pole vault. The relay team ran off from their oppon- 
ents. This meet showed the Pirates that they had a good squad, and from then on they pointed 
to the conference meet. The next meet was with St. Edwards, which was the only meet that 
was held at home. The Pirates were easily victorious, winning by a large score. Bledsoe, 
Story, Brooks, McKenzie, Smith, Brown, were easy winners in all their races; Bledsoe win- 
ning both the hundred and two-twenty; Story, Bledsoe, McDaniels, Brown, and Durrenburger 
winning the relay; Smith winning the shot put, discus, and javelin; Brooks the high jump, and 
McKenzie the pole vault, 






--^^ 



Page J/8 



;\ 




Bledsoe 



McKenzie 



McDa 



In order to test the strength of the team, Coach Edens entered the boys in a six point meet in 
Austin with Texas University, Daniel Baker, St. Edwards, Howard Payne, Southwest State 
Teachers College and Southwestern University competing. The Pirates showed up well, 
placing a close second to Daniel Baker. McDaniels won the 440, Smith won two second 
places in the shot put and discus. Brooks placing in the high jump and McKenzie placing in 
the pole vault. The feature of the meet was the race between Snodgrass of Daniel Baker and 
Bledsoe of the Pirates. Bledsoe gave the fast Snodgrass a fight in both the hundred and two- 
twenty. A special feature of the meet was a special four-forty relay between RadclifF, Bledsoe, 
Snodgrass, and Phelps against the football relay team of Texas University which won the 
special relay at the Drake relays. Then came the Conference meet in which Southwestern 
showed up exceptionally well even though they failed to win the relay, which race South- 
western has excelled for the past four years. Bledsoe won the hundred yard dash and placed 
in the two-twenty. Brooks placed in the high jump and Smith placed in the shot put and discus. 
Howard Payne was easily the outstanding team in the meet and won the meet in a walk. The 
feature attraction was the races between Bledsoe of Southwestern and LiUis of Austin College 
in the hundred and two-twentv. 



Page tjg 




I J! 




Brown 



Ma 



G. Sn 



M!' • 



Captain Smith, one of the mainstays of the Pirate thinly clads, made an exceptionally good and 
capable leader. He always managed to place in all the events in which he entered. Even 
when he went to Huntsville he challenged one of the members of the opposing team to a hundred 
yard dash and Smith easily defeated his opponent. 

Story, a two-letter man, was one of the most consistent performers for the canary and black. 
He was one of the most important members of the relay team. Besides running in the relay he 
usually ran the 440. 

Brooks, another two-letter man, usually added his part to the point-gathering and in every 
meet he managed to make a few points for the team. 

Bledsoe, a boy who only joined the thinly clads this year, proved a good track man because 
he ran the 100 in 9.9 at one meet. He won the 100 at the conference meet and in each meet he 
entered he made some points. 

McKenzie, a freshman, proved to be good enough with pole vaulting to place in most of the 

meets. 

McDaniels, a three-letter man, who usually won the 440 and ran anchor man on the relay team. 
Brown, a newcomer to the team, who proved to be a good man in the 880 and the relay team. 

May was one who could be depended on to win a few points in the weights and usually 
pushed Captain Smith in each of the meets. 

G. Smith, a letter man who proved to be a good pole vaulter and also broad jumper. 



Page iSo 




OTHER SPORTS 




11 I ■! 



'I:' 




Under the leadership of Captain Wilcox, 
the Southwestern Netters passed through 
a fairly successful season even though they 
did not win any meets. Always the op- 
posing team had to play its hardest to de- 
feat the fighting Pirates. Wilcox played 
No 1 and of course he won most of his 
matches. One of the best matches seen, 
was the match between Wilcox and Bun- 
ing of Sam Houston. Boothe played No. 
2 and even though he failed to win a 
match he always put out his best and 
tried to win. Keyser could always be 
depended on to win his match. Kellog 
was a newcomer to the squad this year 
and before the year was over he proved 
to be a good player and capable of hold- 
ing his own with the best. 






Wilcox Gij'tiiiii 

Boothe 
Kevser 

Kellog 

Southwestern 2 

Southwestern 1 

Southwestern 2 

Southwestern 3 

Southwestern 1 



St. Edwards 4 

Sam Houston 5 

Howard Payne 4 

St. Edwards 3 

San Marcos 5 



^ 



Page JS.' 



1-4,3. 







Moore 



Golf ' 

This IS the first year that Golf has been a mijor sport in conference competi- 
tion and of course Southwestern placed a good team on the links with the hope 
that they would win the first conference championship. As the annual goes 
to press, It IS a good time before the conference meet. It is impossible for us 
to record the results but with two men, Moore and Kellog playing, and as good 
as they are, Dr. Howard, coach, has full confidence in the boys and thinks that 
without a doubt they will win the conference championship. 

Moore and Kellog are fine players and both have had experience in 
tournament play. Since they are polished players, they should bring home the 
bacon. 



^L 



Page iSs 



=!■■■■•{ 



Iiiter-Fratemity Sports 



As has been the custom for the past number of years, the different fraternities on the campus 
have organized athletic teams to represent them in their annual athletic league. Much interest 
has been shown throughout the entire year by the groups in this line of activity. The different 
sports are organized and sponsored by the Men's Pan-Hellenic Council which draws up the 
rules and regulations for the different phases of physical activity. 

The Pi K. As again won the basketball championship and not a defeat was charged to them. 
The K. As gave some strong competition, as did the other two fraternities. The league was 
exceptionally strong this year and not until the very last was the outcome certain. The K. 
As forfeited the last game to the Pi. K. As, thereby giving the championship to the latter. 

The tennis singles title was won by Fred Leigh, Kappa Sigma, but not until he was extended 
to the limit by Thomas, Kappa Alpha. The doubles title went to Dorbandt and Price, Kappa 
Sigmas, but Story and McKenzie, Pi. K. As gave them some strong competition in the finals. 
Thus the Sigs still hold supreme in the inter-fraternity tennis. 

As the annual goes to press, the baseball tournament is well under way with the K. As hold- 
ing the lead and it looks as if they will repeat again this year although the Pi. K. A's are giving 
them some strong competition and anything might happen before the schedule is completed. 

In the track meet which is coming soon (and I am very sorry that I will not be able to record 
the results), it looks like the Pi K. As will again win the meet, as they have the same team back 
which won the contest last year. 

Golf IS a toss-up between all four of the fraternities, as each one will place a strong team on 
the greens. Each of the frats is anxious to win this tournament and much interest is being 
shown in the coming tournament in which the golf king will be selected. 

Much interest has been shown this year in the different sports and with each new year more 
interest has been shown and some good and capable talent has been revealed. 



I 



i 



Page 1S4 




Circumstances sometimes compelled the duly con- 
stituted authorities to subject certain unsocial individuals 
to the humiliation and ridicule of imprisonment in the 
stocks. 



THE SOU JOKER 



Iv'S: 






f ^'HIS section is dedicated to the 

\^J) (J students's friend, the Disciphne 
Committee, vs^hose routine v/ork 
has done more to make this part 
of the book possible than the 
concentrated efforts of all its 
worthy Staff. 



Gl DEDICATION fa 



1 1'.::; 



ara 



(Kinda Sour) 

Due to the fact that the good brothers of the noble (?) order of Kappa Sigma had to be in 
keeping with the changing customs of the University, their pledges have started serving grape 
juice to the members instead. The Woman's Building reception room is their chapter house 
and juggling the brass pots and pans is their pastime. They have some good boys in the chapter 
but they don't stay at the house or associate with the brothers. Brother Buchholz is the big 
cause of the recent campaign at the Woman's Building and two or three unfortunate Zeta 
freshmen are the results. The only requirement to join is to be enrolled in school and if you 
don't have a bad case of swelled head please try to look human. Some prefer to be Kappa Sigs 
but others prefer to be fraternity men. 



Pi Kappa Alpka 

(Putrid Kinda Apples) 



This gang founded the famous huddle system and led by Penny Mood they are still holding 
their own. They possess good qualities provided of course that one permits flexibility of the 
truth. They are unfortunate in one way because Brother Hamme and Brother Price have the 
"choc" but in another way thev are fortunate because they never stay around the house. The 
original object in the founding of this club was to develop after-dinner speakers and look at 
the results — Fred McKenzie. Their one drawback is their exaggerated modesty and their hang' 
out is the river. 



'i J 



)a /iipiia 

(Kindred (of) Anthropoids) 



These boys are truly the aristocrats of the old South. They initiated a man once but none 
of the present members can remember w^hen. Their semi-annual publication is the Progressive 
Farmer and Bob Brent is their hired hand. They are big buddies of the Kappa Sigs and plans 
are being made to unite the two so they can accomplish something. One thing that these 
boys can boast of is that they are a part of the student body and another is Bill Smith (but why 
boast). Cortes is their overseer and from the looks of things he will be with them sometime 
yet. Terry is their one hope but he can't uphold the moral character of some three or fifteen. 



Pki Delta Theta 

(Pretty Dumb Theoridically) 

Several boys were in search of a national name one day, so they founded this chapter. They 
were successful last spring in pledging every boy who had ten cents change and an extra shirt. 
Their theme song is: "The Sweetheart of Everyone Else" and their motto is: "Throw the bull." 
We haven't written much about this chapter but for the benefit of those who are in doubt of 
its existence here, just ask Gill DeWitt. 



Zeta Tan Alplia 



(Zealous to All) 

Yes, this IS a sorority the same as the other three. They have managed to gather in one flock, 
a few biological impossibilities and have called it the Zeta Tau Alpha Sewing Circle. The 
name, however, is to deceive the Dean. They really have nothing to be stuck up over but still 
they can't seem to get away from an "Old Spanish Custom. " They have a good president 
who takes orders from the real ramrod — a Tri Delt. The Y. W. C. A. is their aim in life and 
their present pastime is to run after the Kappa Sigs. 



elta Delta D 



(Don't Do Dot) 

They thought so much of this organization till they named it three times. The survival of 
the fittest IS practiced and innocence prevails throughout its circles. One of their old reliables 
has gone Zeta in spirit and the other initiates have made no effort to show the freshmen anything 
— we doubt if they know anything themselves. They are very exclusive, taking only a few 
each year. The Zeta's have long since turned over the pin-getting banner to them and at 
present one of their little blond-headed promises is hard at work after another — time will tell. 



PM Mu 



(Partly Moved) 

Unlike other groups, these girls keep to themselves. Their high scholastic average is 
doubtless a result of many nights of concentrated study. Of course there are reasons for this. 
The town sisters are the life of the party and their Alumni often come around and tell them of 
the good old days. 



:!I*[VT 



■r' 



1 1 ' ' 



Alpka Delta Pi 

(Always Do Poorly) 

If cute, quiet girls were the kind that get over, the Alpha Delts would certainly be in de- 
mand. Their sisterhood is not hampered, however, because they have some that could give 
even a Zeta a good race. They uphold the traditions of the school — in some ways — es' 
pecially on warm nights. They indulge in renting cars and in sending boys' shirts to the laundry. 



r ; 



(Bolsheviks) 

It would be impossible to go into detail about these — well, we will call them students, too. 
They are those who fight fraternities and would take a bid if they could get it. They are led 
by the invincible Charles Rumble and at the Woman's Building by Gorzycki. Their hang- 
out IS King's Palace and their pastime is making somebody miserable — Don't get them con- 
fused with the nonfraternity men because there is all the difference in the world. 

The University Store 

What would we do without the store? 

College life would be a bore, 

It's a place where everyone goes 

Even the Zetas with their beaus — 

No one really goes there to eat. 

But it's a good place for friends to meet. 

The Alpha Delta by nine o'clock can't wake 

But at ten they come to the store for cake. 

After classes the crowds go there 

And stay about as long as they dare. 

If the walls their secrets could tell, 

Many a Prof would scream and yell. 

Dates are hashed, from the known to the blind — 

The fast, or slow, or any other kind. 

Here the girls chat as well as the boys 

About their troubles and their joys. 

It's a good place to open your book 

And give your lessons the first wild look. 

The Tri Delts know it's the place to stay, 

If they want to find a Pi K. A. 

The Kappa Sigs their politics play. 



TJie University 

{Continued^ 



And go to the store every single day. 
Line after line this tale could go, so, 
But most of It you already know. 
No matter whatever may be the weather, 
The store is the place to get together. 

Tke Team 

(Selected on merits as Donkeys?) 

L. E. — -Billy Stokes. 

L. T.— Polly Wacker. 

L. G. — Charlie Fredrick. 

C. — Bob Brent (captain and manager). 

R. G. — Louis Price. 

R. T. — Fred Sterling. 

R. E. — Milton Gray. 

Q. B.— Beatty Oldham. 

H. B.— Bill Smith. 

H. B.— Joe McAuliffe. 

F. B. — Charles Rumble. 

Coach: Jumbo Elzner. 

Water Boy: Red Boothe. 

We Wonder 

Why Blu Stinschomb isn't a Kappa Sig — 

Why Harry Moore w^orries the girls so much — 

Why Fontaine Erskine doesn't wake up — 

To whom the name "shine boy " applies this year — 

Why the Zetas want to be different — 

What's the matter with Dorothy Bryan's leg — 

Why Reba Young thinks she is so much better than everybody else — • 

Why Louis Price has such a bad case of the swell head — 

Why IS it that Red Lawrence is so in love with Charlie Rumble — 

Why Bert Crawford and Jumbo have decided to organize them a Fraternity of their own, in- 
viting Tex Brown, Joe McAuliffe, Charlie Rumble, Ben Bohmfalk, Charlie Fredrick, 
Red Boothe and George Walton — • 

Why Joe McAuliffe says that he did an experiment in Chemistry lab w^ith Cedar Bark- 

Dr. Howard; This exam will be conducted on the Honor System — Please take three seats 
apart on alternate rows. 



: ' I 



..'K 



First 

Methodist 

Clmrcli 

Georgetown, Texas 



Wesley, the Founder of Meth- 
odism, did not think that his 
work would last as long as it 
has. The Methodist Church 
here is one of the thousands of 
Churches which have been 
builded because of the high and 
noble life which John Wesley 
lived. 



I ■ 





Reverend Edmund Heinsohn 

A man who is carrying out the principles which Wesley lived 
and set dow^n for the Methodists to live by. Brother Heinsohn 
IS one of the great number of preachers who are following in the 
footsteps of Wesley. 




Send your clothes to my Dad 

R.L.LOGAN 

Ury Chicaners — Hatters — Uyers 



Phone 262 



Georgetown 



IW. 



'}l-l 



"^ 




they have a Httle ticklin' in 
the throat that seems to tell 
'em something cold will help 
... or if there is a craving for 
a bite to eat ... it is always 
to the Alcove Confectionery 
that the Southwestern student 
body finds its way. They 
love those thirst quenching 
drinks and hunger satisfying 
sandwiches . . . plus that 
jiffy service. 

Centre of all student activities 

The ALCOVE 

CONFECTIONERY 



) 



an 



when those fair co-eds of the 
S. U. Campus want that ap- 
pearance that gives them a 
feeling of self confidence . . . 
that feeling that makes their 
companionship sought . . . 
they are not long wending 
their way to the Alcove 
Beauty Shoppe. They like 
those expert operators . . . 
aided by the most modern 
equipment that money can 
buy . . . and they are sure of 
courteous service. 

Up-stairs over 
the Alcove Confectionery 

The ALCOVE 

BEAUTY SHOP 



The REA'S 



Mr. Brit Rea \_Ylt tS^LLil\ \^ Mrs. M. A. Rea 

"EVER SEEKING TO BETTER SERVE SOUTHWESTERN" 




(l^eai/// (jfaeJi^H"Cip unclerfbK]dm^,lnelljful fer\/ice.''and iDrmt-fej-tecL 
^ p/cffef that Ijn'nf n^ht-'haVe been the contHbuflonf afjoufhujeftem 
-fn{m \^n{ (bmpajixm the producf/on ufthif \/o/ume 





SOUTHWESTERN ENGRWING COMPANY 

Fort Worth -Dallas -Houston- San Antonio 

ATnarillo -Wicnita Falls -Beaumont 

Tulsa - Oklanoma Cit>^ 



f 




The task IS finished, hut only for today 
T^omorrow will hring forth new work 



Here is the fruit of toil. Into this work is woven the moments of many 
hours and here is fashioned the labor and hearts of many. It has been work 
inspired by the hope that because of it some good will come. If this can 
be, what matters it if time meant for rest has been spent for labor — -where 
is the loss if hours have been taken from the night to lengthen the day? 

All service and all achievement, great or small, demands some sacrifice. 
Work must precede realization, and the love of work is the greater part of 
compensation. By comparison, no work is perfect. Today's efforts are 
better than the past, and the toil of Tomorrow will excel the task of the 
hour — but none have been, nor will ever be, more engaging. This work 
has indeed been pleasant to those who brought it into being, and it has been 
our pleasure to work with them. 





The E. L Steck Company 

Malicrs of Fine School Annual 
Austin, Texas 




A 



QJ^ ■■ 






Drive a New Ford V-8 


Compliments 


Power — Speed — Flexibilit y 


of 


Fine Car Performance at Ford Prices 


PIRATE TAVERN 




(Clifford "Skinnie" Hausenfluke) 


g||9 


Where Students 




Are Always Welcome 


c^^huf/ti4tjf//m)tiyrt){yfnJin/n/u 






^J^ 


s^tLee ^^^^^ e€Ri.vijes 


Compliments 


The Belford Lumber Co. 


of 






Lumber and Contracting 


PALACE 




THEATER 


Building Material of 




all kinds 


"Where Georgetown 




is Entertained" 


Phone 34 Georgetown, Texas 



Compliments 


«/ 


Rev. C. Raymond Gray — Temple, Texas 


Rev. R. C. Edwards — Graham, Texas 


Rev. S. C. Dunn — Lockhart, Texas 


Rev. Edmund Heinsohn — Georgetown, Texas 


Rev. W. M. Pearce — Vernon, Texas .^ ■ 


B. L. Page 




PALACE BARBER 




SHOP 


Compliments 


Back of City National Bank 


of 


Where the students always find 


THE NOOK 


the best 




in barber work. 




' 


Georgetown, Texas 


e||0 




A. B. Rhodes Fin Bartley 





R. J. STONE 

Southwestern s Photograyhcr 

GEORGETOWN. TEXAS 



FINE PORTRAITURE 

Portraits done in oil color on canvas, 
miniatures on ivory 



Where there is beauty he takes it. 
Where there is none he makes it. 



I' ! 



i 



''\ If 



THE ONLY MASTER 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 

IN GEORGETOWN 



* ' ■ . :' 




Phone 1 1 



TROY LAUNDRY DRY CLEANERS 
Dyers and Hatters 



)' ■: 



Yea Pirates, We Are 
For You 

WM. CAMHROS 
LU MBHR CO. 

R. R. Messer, Manager 
Phone 42 


. 


^ We carry all University Books, New 
and Second Hand, and a complete line 
of Supplies. We buy back all Books 
that will be used again. 

9 Nice Line of Jewelry and Watches. 
Do Watch and Jewelry Repairing, and 
Picture Framing. 

We Appreciate Your Trade 

WILCOX BROS. 

Jewelers and Stationery 


PATRIC BROTHRRS 

DRY CLEANERS 

"We are students at heart, and take great pride in saying that 
Southwestern Students and patrons are our friends" 

14 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

Our representatives are always glad to 

co-operate by giving satisfactory 

Service 

Phone 381 Georgetown, Texas 



I : j ■!, 



'.■■•II,,;:* 



L ne J arniers Otate 


Dan^ 


^eo rg eto wn , "Tex a s 






& 






Georgetown, the home of Southwestern Uni- 




versity, is a good place to live. 


It is the 




best residence town in the state. 






This bank will appreciate your 


account. 


'- 


whether large or small. 




-V, 


Our banking facilities are the best 


and are 




all at the service of our customers. 






If you live here, come in and see us. You 




will be welcome. 






If you live elsewhere, write us for 


informa- 




tion or any service and your letters will 




receive the prompt attention of our 


informa- 




tion department. 






t 






DIRECTORS 






E. G. GiLLETT, President 


W. L. Price, Cashier 


D. W. Wilcox 






H. M. Graves 






H. LUNDBLAD 







>)''.!■ i 



\ a/hen in after years you turn the pages of this Sou'wester, the class 
' ^ history of the year of 1931-1932 and view the photographs of old 
friends and acquaintances, may this familiar slogan, "THE SIGN OF GOOD 
CLOTHES" that has appeared in all your college publications again come to 
your mind, and your friends and supporters at this store that features the new- 
est of college styles while they are new. 




r^'^ ir ' ^^.J"J^<,f>J^4.Hl Vo"^i\^4>r 



T?^' 



«..IJ 



lli^i^ , 



)|.f w*'—- ^ GEORGETOWN, TEXAS :::!lC.v;tr^^f 



McINNIS DRUG CO 

THE REXALL STORE 

"The Best in Drug Store Service 
The Best in Drug Store Merchandise" 



M ■' 



' I 



MM 



Compliments of 

Wilcox S Graves 

Georgetown, Texas 


Compliments of 

Ben Franklin Store 

F. E. BucHOLZ 


Compliments of 

Dr. Hobson Martin 

Georgetown, Texas 


E. L. MUNSON 

Successor to 

Henderson's Garage 

Dealer in TEXACO PRODUCTS 


Compliments of 

Thompson Repair Shop 

Washing — Greasing — Polishing 
Georgetown, Texas 


Compliments of 

EDWARDS CAFE 

Georgetown, Texas 


Clark the Tailor 

Suits Repaired, Altered and 
Sold 

Fine Tailoring Only 


Compliments of 

THE SOUTHWEST 
TELEPHONE CO. 

E. P. Seaman, Dist. Mgr 


Compliments of 

ROYAL CAFE 

Georgetown, Texas 


Compliments of 

BLUE MOON 

Georgetown, Texas 


CompUrnents of 

eat-a-bit cafe 

Georgetown, Texas 


Compliments of 

HUMPTY DUMPTY 

Georgetown, Texas 



LM.Scarbrough & Sons 



With a COLLEGIATE SHOP— 

9 ® where its personnel make it their business to knew just 
what type of dresses and cuats the University girls want, and to 
have them for little money. 

With a STUDENTS^ SHOP— 

^ @ where suits, topcoats, hats and furnishings spirited for 
youth, yet constructed of quality — have made this a favorite with 
young University men. 

With many OTHER SHOPS— 

® @ equally alert to the preferences of modern youth, always 
striving to serve the community, always offering quality mer- 
chandise, priced with respect to 1932 budgetcering. 

Austin, 
Texas. 



Coynpliments of 



^r^ 



<J.: E. E JE JE ID 



(2^#Q 



Austin, Texas 



This book is cased in an S. K. 
SMITH COVER — a cover that 
is guaranteed to be satisfactory and 
is created and SMITHCRAFTED 
by an organization of craftsmen 
specializing in the creation and 
production of good covers. What- 
ever your cover requirements may 
be, this organization can satisfy 
them. 

Send for information and 
prices to: 

TL 

O. rX. Ornitn v^ompariL) 

213 Institute Place 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



\^onipliiiient5 

of 

a Jcriena 



Good Luc\ to Sou' west 



Compliments 
-— of 

DR. VAN C. TIPTON 

Georgetown, Texas 


Stromberg-Hoffman 
8 Co. 

DRY GOODS 

Georgetown, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

Georgetown 
Electric Shoe Shop 


Compliments 
of 

Georgetown Motor Co. 

Phone 1 20 


Compliments 
of 

W. W. WEST 

Houston, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

E. L. GRAIN 

Houston, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

DR. S. J. CLARK 

Austin, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

Dr. M. H. Boerner, M. D. 

Austin, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

DR. SAM H. KEY 

Austin, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

B. A. ELZNER 

Bastrop. Texas 


Compliments 
of 

J. W. BOOTHE 

Daisetta, Texas 


Compliments 
of 

J. M. CRAWFORD 

Victoria, Texas 



I!- ,: 'r- it 



r) 



ACME 


TEXAS SERVICE 


Dry Cleaners — Hatters 


STATION 


— Dyers 


Texaco Products 


Georgetown, Texas 


EXPERT WASHING AND 




GREASING SERVICE 


One of the most modern 
equipped plants 


GOODRICH TIRES AND TUBES 


in Central Texas 


DRIVERLESS RENT CARS 


Phone 76 


Phone 560 


THEO. MILES 


This book is cased in an S. K. Smith 
cover — a cover that is guaranteed to be 


For First Class Work 


satisfactory and is created and SMITH- 




CRAFTED by an organization of 




craftsmen specializing in the creation 




and production of good covers. What- 


DRY CLEANERS 


ever your cover requirements may be, 
this organization can satisfy them. 


HATTERS DYERS 






Send for information and prices to 




THE S. K. SMITH 






COMPANY 


Georgetown, Texas 


213 INSTITUTE Place 
Chicago, Illinois 



^ all good wishes 

to 

Ooutniv^estern Virraouates anaOtuaents 

are extended by 

JE55E H. JONE5 



and certain other interests with 
which he is identified. 



THE NATIONAL BANK OF 
COMMERCE — Houston 

"The Bank of Courtesy" with a 
very modern faciHty for complete 
service. Capital $1,000,000.00; 
Surplus $2,000,000.00. 

JESSE H. JONES « CO. — Houston 

Downtown office buildings, retail 
locations and business property. 

BANKERS MORTGAGE COMPANY 
Houston 

First Mortgage 6% Collateral 
Trust Gold Bonds, backed by 22 
years service without loss to a 
client and capital funds over 
$3,000,000.00 



RICE HOTEL 



Houston 



The largest in Dixie is "Hous- 
ton's welcome to the world." 
One thousand outside rooms. 
B. F. Orr, Manager. 



TEXAS STATE HOTEL — Houston 

Carrying forward the finest tra- 
ditions of Southern hospitality. 
400 rooms. Louis Marchette, 
Manager. 



LAMAR HOTEL 



Houston 



Apartments and suites, comfort- 
able spacious rooms. "Black 
Mammy" Cafeteria. Spanish 
Dining Room. R. Bruce Carter, 
Gen'l Manager. 

SAN JACINTO HOTEL — Houston 

Offers every modern convenience 
for the comfort of permanent 
and transient guests. R. Bruce 
Carter, Manager. 

WORTH HOTEL — Ft. Worth 

A completely modern Hotel in 
the center of downtown Fort 
Worth. Jack Farrell, Manager. 



THE HOUSTON CHRONICLE 

Houston's leading paper. Circulation 

85,000 daily; over 100,000 

Sunday. 




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WELCOME! Exes and Your Friends 
to These Two Fine Hotels 



Lamar 
Hotel 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

A quiet, dignified hotel 
of service that portrays 
tlie finest traditions of 
Southern hospitality in 
a way to be more than 
pleasing. Rates $2.50 
and up, with bath. 




Texas State 
Hotel 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Houston's newest and 
most modern from both 
the standpoint of service 
and appointments. A 
comfortable room at 
12.50 and up with bath 
— and WHAT a bath. 



R. BRUCE (Nick) CARTER, General Manager 



THE DRISKILL 

Austin's Largest Hotel 



300 Rooms of Solid 
Comfort 



Southwestern students and 

friends are invited to make our 

home your home. 

W. L. Stark, Manager 



DIAMONDS — WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

Sold on Terms as Low as 

$1.00 Down $1.00 Week 



If you are honest we will sell you 

on Credit no matter where 

you live 

Credit at Cash Prices 



McKINNON'S 

CREDIT JEWELERS 

607 Congress Ave. 
Austin, Texas 



Compliments 
of 

MAJESTIC MAN'S SHOP 

Eddie Joseph, Manager 

CLOTHING — SHOES AND 
FURNISHINGS 



Austin, 



Texas 



Featuring 



BULOVA WATCHES 



JOE KOEN S SON 



lewd 



cwacrs 



105 EAST SIXTH STREET 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 



SAME LOCATION 43 YEARS 



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The Staff of the Sou'wester '32 
wishes to gratefully acknowledge 
the kindness of one, who by her 
friendly interest and material sup- 
port, has proven herself to be one 
of Southwesterns loyal Ex-Stu- 
dents; 



MRS. J. J. PERKINS 
Wichita Falls, Texas 





PAY 
BELL'S 
EASY 
WAY 



$1 A 

WEEK 

WILL 

DO! 



You eliminate all doubt when 

you purchase from 

BELfS 

Texas' Oldest Jewelers 



for 79 Years 

Bell's Have Been 
Known for Quality 

DIAMONDS 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE 



'-''Home of Qood J^ick Wedding Things' 




516 E. Houston Established 1852 

San Antonio, Texas 



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